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Title: Ecology of red maple swamps in the glaciated northeast: A community profile

Abstract

The report is part of a series of profiles on the ecology of wetland and deepwater habitats. This particular profile addresses red maple swamps in the glaciated northeastern United States. Red maple (Acer rubrum) swamp is a dominant wetland type in most of the region; it reaches the greatest abundance in southern New England and northern New Jersey; where it comprises 60-80% of all inland wetlands. Red maple swamps occur in a wide variety of hydrogeologic settings, from small, isolated basins in till or glaciofluvial deposits to extensive wetland complexes on glacial lake beds, and from hillside seeps to stream floodplains and lake edges. Individual swamps may be seasonally flooded, temporarily flooded, or seasonally saturated, and soils may be mineral or organic. As many as five distinct vegetation layers may occur in these swamps, including trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs, and ground cover plants such as bryophytes and clubmosses.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7305115
Report Number(s):
PB-94-157468/XAB; BIOLOGICAL--12
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; FORESTS; ECOLOGY; WETLANDS; GEOMORPHOLOGY; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ECOSYSTEMS; GEOLOGY 090700* -- Biomass Fuels-- Resources-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Golet, F.C., Calhoun, A.J.K., DeRagon, W.R., Lowry, D.J., and Gold, A.J. Ecology of red maple swamps in the glaciated northeast: A community profile. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Golet, F.C., Calhoun, A.J.K., DeRagon, W.R., Lowry, D.J., & Gold, A.J. Ecology of red maple swamps in the glaciated northeast: A community profile. United States.
Golet, F.C., Calhoun, A.J.K., DeRagon, W.R., Lowry, D.J., and Gold, A.J. 1993. "Ecology of red maple swamps in the glaciated northeast: A community profile". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7305115,
title = {Ecology of red maple swamps in the glaciated northeast: A community profile},
author = {Golet, F.C. and Calhoun, A.J.K. and DeRagon, W.R. and Lowry, D.J. and Gold, A.J.},
abstractNote = {The report is part of a series of profiles on the ecology of wetland and deepwater habitats. This particular profile addresses red maple swamps in the glaciated northeastern United States. Red maple (Acer rubrum) swamp is a dominant wetland type in most of the region; it reaches the greatest abundance in southern New England and northern New Jersey; where it comprises 60-80% of all inland wetlands. Red maple swamps occur in a wide variety of hydrogeologic settings, from small, isolated basins in till or glaciofluvial deposits to extensive wetland complexes on glacial lake beds, and from hillside seeps to stream floodplains and lake edges. Individual swamps may be seasonally flooded, temporarily flooded, or seasonally saturated, and soils may be mineral or organic. As many as five distinct vegetation layers may occur in these swamps, including trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs, and ground cover plants such as bryophytes and clubmosses.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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