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Title: Perspectives on energy in India. [Review]

Abstract

The authors attempt to place India's energy problems in the perspective of the country's geographic location and its technological base. They are concerned primarily with patterns of energy consumption, the fuels or other sources required to produce this energy, and the effect that energy use will have on India's economic development. The overall situation is examined, and both the short-term problems and the long-term outlook are discussed. Considerable attention is devoted to questions of conventional energy supplies and new energy technologies that will fit into the Indian scene. A great deal must be done to translate energy plans into concrete and specific programs of action. The basic necessities such as food, clothing, and shelter for India's population, estimated to reach 950 million by the year 2000, can only be achieved with increased production requiring substantial growth of per capita energy consumption from present levels. In the context of India's needs, this undoubtedly is an immense task and one has to view energy resources, development, utilization, and conservation as part of a total system comprising urban and rural life styles--agricultural, industrial, transportation, housing, and domestic needs of the society. New techniques will have to be developed and utilized optimally at severalmore » levels in various sectors of the nation. Energy conservation and efficient use of existing energy sources must be more vigorously pursued. Fusion energy and solar energy are twin challenges for meeting future energy demands. The outlook for new energy sources is quite bright, but they must be developed with the aim of supplementing the conventional sources rather than displacing them. The challenges are very great, as are the rewards. 7 tables, 5 figures, 9 references.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Technology Bhavan, New Delhi
OSTI Identifier:
7295510
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annu. Rev. Energy; (United States); Journal Volume: 2; Other Information: Views expressed are those of authors and are not necessarily those of the government of India
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ENERGY SUPPLIES; FORECASTING; INDIA; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ENERGY SOURCES; RESOURCES; REVIEWS; ASIA; DOCUMENT TYPES; EFFICIENCY; 292000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting; 298000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Consumption & Utilization; 320000 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization

Citation Formats

Ramachandran, A., and Gururaja, J.. Perspectives on energy in India. [Review]. United States: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.02.110177.002053.
Ramachandran, A., & Gururaja, J.. Perspectives on energy in India. [Review]. United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.02.110177.002053.
Ramachandran, A., and Gururaja, J.. 1977. "Perspectives on energy in India. [Review]". United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.02.110177.002053.
@article{osti_7295510,
title = {Perspectives on energy in India. [Review]},
author = {Ramachandran, A. and Gururaja, J.},
abstractNote = {The authors attempt to place India's energy problems in the perspective of the country's geographic location and its technological base. They are concerned primarily with patterns of energy consumption, the fuels or other sources required to produce this energy, and the effect that energy use will have on India's economic development. The overall situation is examined, and both the short-term problems and the long-term outlook are discussed. Considerable attention is devoted to questions of conventional energy supplies and new energy technologies that will fit into the Indian scene. A great deal must be done to translate energy plans into concrete and specific programs of action. The basic necessities such as food, clothing, and shelter for India's population, estimated to reach 950 million by the year 2000, can only be achieved with increased production requiring substantial growth of per capita energy consumption from present levels. In the context of India's needs, this undoubtedly is an immense task and one has to view energy resources, development, utilization, and conservation as part of a total system comprising urban and rural life styles--agricultural, industrial, transportation, housing, and domestic needs of the society. New techniques will have to be developed and utilized optimally at several levels in various sectors of the nation. Energy conservation and efficient use of existing energy sources must be more vigorously pursued. Fusion energy and solar energy are twin challenges for meeting future energy demands. The outlook for new energy sources is quite bright, but they must be developed with the aim of supplementing the conventional sources rather than displacing them. The challenges are very great, as are the rewards. 7 tables, 5 figures, 9 references.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.eg.02.110177.002053},
journal = {Annu. Rev. Energy; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 1977,
month = 1
}
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