skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Solar history and human affairs

Abstract

Historical research at different time scales from 10s to 1000s of years suggests that solar variation may have influences on global climate. Climate change has had significant impacts on cultures during these periods. Very high solar output during the Medieval Optimum would be expected to have particularly large impacts on peoples of that time as sunspot numbers are thought to have reached one third again any values observed in the current century. Certain other impacts can be inferred from modern populations. For example, the higher parts of the solar cycle are associated with greater incidence of skin melanoma.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network, University Center, MI (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7291647
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Human Ecology; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 22:1; Journal ID: ISSN 0300-7839
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CLIMATIC CHANGE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; SOLAR CYCLE; ECONOMIC IMPACT; SOCIAL IMPACT; 290300* - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety; 290200 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Eddy, J.A. Solar history and human affairs. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1007/BF02168761.
Eddy, J.A. Solar history and human affairs. United States. doi:10.1007/BF02168761.
Eddy, J.A. Tue . "Solar history and human affairs". United States. doi:10.1007/BF02168761.
@article{osti_7291647,
title = {Solar history and human affairs},
author = {Eddy, J.A.},
abstractNote = {Historical research at different time scales from 10s to 1000s of years suggests that solar variation may have influences on global climate. Climate change has had significant impacts on cultures during these periods. Very high solar output during the Medieval Optimum would be expected to have particularly large impacts on peoples of that time as sunspot numbers are thought to have reached one third again any values observed in the current century. Certain other impacts can be inferred from modern populations. For example, the higher parts of the solar cycle are associated with greater incidence of skin melanoma.},
doi = {10.1007/BF02168761},
journal = {Human Ecology; (United States)},
issn = {0300-7839},
number = ,
volume = 22:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {3}
}