skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

Abstract

This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sloan-Kettering Inst. for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7262962
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/60407-7
ON: DE92040310
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-86ER60407
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; GALLIUM 66; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; IODINE 124; URIDINE; DIAGNOSTIC USES; CYCLOTRONS; FLUORINE 18; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROGRESS REPORT; RADIOCHEMISTRY; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; ACCELERATORS; AZINES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CHEMISTRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CYCLIC ACCELERATORS; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DOCUMENT TYPES; DRUGS; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; FLUORINE ISOTOPES; GALLIUM ISOTOPES; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; IODINE ISOTOPES; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; LIGHT NUCLEI; MEDICINE; NANOSEC LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NUCLEI; NUCLEOSIDES; NUCLEOTIDES; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PYRIMIDINES; RADIOISOTOPES; RIBOSIDES; TOMOGRAPHY; URACILS; USES; 550604* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.2172/7262962.
Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. United States. doi:10.2172/7262962.
Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.. 1992. "Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides". United States. doi:10.2172/7262962. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7262962.
@article{osti_7262962,
title = {Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides},
author = {Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.},
abstractNote = {This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.},
doi = {10.2172/7262962},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This research continues the long term goals of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. This program fits into the nuclear medicine component of DOE`s mission, which is aimed at enhancing the beneficial applications of radiation, radionuclides, and stable isotopes in the diagnosis, study and treatment of human diseases. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology/Immunology; and Imaging Physics. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Section under the DOE grant during the 1992--1995more » will be employed in the Pharmacology/Immunology component in the period 1996--1999. Imaging Physics resolves relevant imaging related physics issues that arise during the experimentation that results. In addition to the basic research mission, this project also provides a basis for training of research scientists in radiochemistry, immunology, bioengineering and imaging physics.« less
  • This new DOE proposal appropriately builds on past developments. The development and application of radionuclides for diagnosis, treatment and research has been a continuing concern for more than the past three decades. A brief description of this development and previous achievements was considered important in order to provide a frame of reference for the evolving program here. Earlier, the use of certain radionuclides, radon progeny and I-131 in particular, and also x-rays, had been developed by the work of such pioneers as Failla, Quimby and Marinelli. In 1952, at the instigation of Dr. C.P. Rhoads, Director of both Memorial Hospitalmore » and Sloan-Kettering Institute, the restoration of the Department of Physics and Biophysics was undertaken in response to a perceived need to promote the utilization of radionuclides and of high energy radiations for therapeutic, diagnostic and research purposes. This resulted in several research and developmental projects with close clinical collaboration in areas of radiation treatment; medical studies with radionuclides and labeled compounds; the diagnostic uses of x-rays; and some projects in surgery and other clinical areas. Aspects of some of these projects that have had some relevance for the evolving AEC-DOE projects are outlined briefly. 34 refs.« less
  • The overall objective of this work was to promote nuclear medicine applications in oncology. This is being done by improving the scientific basis of diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up with cyclotron-produced tracers. For diagnostic use, positron-emitting isotopes such as Ga-66 and I-124 are being used. Initial studies on the characterization of He-4 particle energies required for Ga-66 production have been completed. Parameters for I-124 radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies have been determined; the labelled antibodies have been used in animal studies using positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify antibody concentration within tumors in vivo. Imaging physics studies have demonstrated that I-124more » can be quantitatively imaged by PET, even in the presence of 100-told greater concentrations of I-131. Measurement of concentrations of label in vivo has been accomplished in nuclei mice bearing neuroblastoma tumors and nude rats bearing human ovarian cancer cells. These studies have major implications for both the quantification of dosimetry and quantification kinetic assessment of anti-tumor antibody localization in vivo. For treatment of tumors, F-18 has been incorporated in 2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose and 5-fluoro uridine, and O-15 labelled water has been produced. Reagents incorporating C-11 and N-13 are under development. In a related area, C-14 labelled colchicine is being studied as a means of assaying cells for multiple drug resistance (MDR). Cells expressing MDR are shown to retain significantly less C-14 colchiene. This suggest that colchiene retention may be of useful probe in modelling and studying MDR development in human tumors. The precursor required for producing C-11 colchicine has also been synthesized. 11 refs. (MHB)« less
  • Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunologymore » projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.« less
  • This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunologymore » and pharmacology components of the program.« less