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Title: Embedding knowledge in robot controllers

Abstract

This article reports that finding the right robot for a task and programming it remain key issues facing the industry. Developers, meanwhile, are striving to embed more applications knowledge in robot controllers using high-level languages and autonomy. Although robot components such as motors, arms, and sensors have become highly advanced, the control software and systems integration necessary to support rapidly configurable factory settings have been slow to emerge. The requirements for industrial robots currently are geared more toward performance than autonomy. However, as agile manufacturing issues gain importance, robot flexibility will also become an important requirement.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7246351
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Mechanical Engineering; (United States); Journal Volume: 116:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; PROGRAMMING; ROBOTS; COMMERCIALIZATION; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TRAINING; CONTROL SYSTEMS; EDUCATION; ON-LINE CONTROL SYSTEMS; ON-LINE SYSTEMS 420200* -- Engineering-- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Puttre, M. Embedding knowledge in robot controllers. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Puttre, M. Embedding knowledge in robot controllers. United States.
Puttre, M. 1994. "Embedding knowledge in robot controllers". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7246351,
title = {Embedding knowledge in robot controllers},
author = {Puttre, M.},
abstractNote = {This article reports that finding the right robot for a task and programming it remain key issues facing the industry. Developers, meanwhile, are striving to embed more applications knowledge in robot controllers using high-level languages and autonomy. Although robot components such as motors, arms, and sensors have become highly advanced, the control software and systems integration necessary to support rapidly configurable factory settings have been slow to emerge. The requirements for industrial robots currently are geared more toward performance than autonomy. However, as agile manufacturing issues gain importance, robot flexibility will also become an important requirement.},
doi = {},
journal = {Mechanical Engineering; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 116:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 6
}
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