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Title: Antibiotic radioprotection of mice exposed to supralethal whole-body irradiation independent of antibacterial activity. [Gamma radiation, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, gentamycin]

Abstract

Oral administration of streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, or gentamicin to specific pathogen-free C57 x Af mice in their drinking water (4 mg/ml) for 2 weeks before supralethal whole-body irradiation very significantly prolonged their mean survival times (8.2 to 8.9 days vs 6.9 for controls) to values which exceed those reported for germ-free mice (7.3 days). The total fecal concentrations of aerobes and anaerobes were reduced by kanamycin, neomycin, and gentamicin. Streptomycin reduced the anaerobes significantly, but not the aerobes. Unlike germ-free mice, these antibiotic-treated mice did excrete free bile acids, products of bacterial action. Oral antibiotic treatment was ineffective in altering the transit time of the intestinal mucosal cells. Previously reported studies had indicated a correlation between decreased transit time and increased survival after irradiation. No significant correlation between mean survival time after irradiation and mucosal transit time was observed. The data demonstrate that certain antibiotics alter the character of the intestinal bacterial flora and increase protection against supralethal doses of whole-body irradiation. It is concluded that the mechanisms of radioresistance in antibiotic-treated mice and germ-free mice are different and that in both groups radioresistance is the result of more than elimination of postirradiation infection.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Baylor Coll., Houston, TX
OSTI Identifier:
7238548
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Radiat. Res.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 68:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ANTIBIOTICS; RADIOSENSITIVITY EFFECTS; BACTERIA; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; GAMMA RADIATION; INTESTINES; MICE; RADIATION PROTECTION; STREPTOMYCIN; SURVIVAL TIME; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DRUGS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; MAMMALS; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Mastromarino, A, and Wilson, R. Antibiotic radioprotection of mice exposed to supralethal whole-body irradiation independent of antibacterial activity. [Gamma radiation, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, gentamycin]. United States: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.2307/3574484.
Mastromarino, A, & Wilson, R. Antibiotic radioprotection of mice exposed to supralethal whole-body irradiation independent of antibacterial activity. [Gamma radiation, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, gentamycin]. United States. https://doi.org/10.2307/3574484
Mastromarino, A, and Wilson, R. Mon . "Antibiotic radioprotection of mice exposed to supralethal whole-body irradiation independent of antibacterial activity. [Gamma radiation, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, gentamycin]". United States. https://doi.org/10.2307/3574484.
@article{osti_7238548,
title = {Antibiotic radioprotection of mice exposed to supralethal whole-body irradiation independent of antibacterial activity. [Gamma radiation, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, gentamycin]},
author = {Mastromarino, A and Wilson, R},
abstractNote = {Oral administration of streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, or gentamicin to specific pathogen-free C57 x Af mice in their drinking water (4 mg/ml) for 2 weeks before supralethal whole-body irradiation very significantly prolonged their mean survival times (8.2 to 8.9 days vs 6.9 for controls) to values which exceed those reported for germ-free mice (7.3 days). The total fecal concentrations of aerobes and anaerobes were reduced by kanamycin, neomycin, and gentamicin. Streptomycin reduced the anaerobes significantly, but not the aerobes. Unlike germ-free mice, these antibiotic-treated mice did excrete free bile acids, products of bacterial action. Oral antibiotic treatment was ineffective in altering the transit time of the intestinal mucosal cells. Previously reported studies had indicated a correlation between decreased transit time and increased survival after irradiation. No significant correlation between mean survival time after irradiation and mucosal transit time was observed. The data demonstrate that certain antibiotics alter the character of the intestinal bacterial flora and increase protection against supralethal doses of whole-body irradiation. It is concluded that the mechanisms of radioresistance in antibiotic-treated mice and germ-free mice are different and that in both groups radioresistance is the result of more than elimination of postirradiation infection.},
doi = {10.2307/3574484},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7238548}, journal = {Radiat. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 68:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1976},
month = {11}
}