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Title: Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene

Abstract

The Wilms tumor gene WT1 encodes a Cys[sub 2]His[sub 2]-type zinc finger protein that can bind DNA and function as a transcriptional regulator. The pathological spectrum of tumorigenesis and various developmental defects produced by different WT1 alteration suggests that WT1 controls a number of subsequent effector genes. To define the role of WT1 in these developmental processes it will be important to elucidate mechanisms that govern expression of WT1 itself. To facilitate mapping of the WT1 promoter region and 5[prime] control elements the authors have determined the sequence upstream of the WT1 transcription unit. This includes the Wit-1 gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. 11 refs., 3 figs.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Philipps-Universitaet, Marburg (Germany))
  2. (Children's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7225729
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; (United States); Journal Volume: 17:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GENES; DNA SEQUENCING; KIDNEYS; NEOPLASMS; PATHOGENESIS; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; BODY; DISEASES; ORGANS; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; 550400* - Genetics; 550900 - Pathology

Citation Formats

Gessler, M., and Bruns, G.A.P. Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1006/geno.1993.1355.
Gessler, M., & Bruns, G.A.P. Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene. United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1993.1355.
Gessler, M., and Bruns, G.A.P. Sun . "Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene". United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1993.1355.
@article{osti_7225729,
title = {Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene},
author = {Gessler, M. and Bruns, G.A.P.},
abstractNote = {The Wilms tumor gene WT1 encodes a Cys[sub 2]His[sub 2]-type zinc finger protein that can bind DNA and function as a transcriptional regulator. The pathological spectrum of tumorigenesis and various developmental defects produced by different WT1 alteration suggests that WT1 controls a number of subsequent effector genes. To define the role of WT1 in these developmental processes it will be important to elucidate mechanisms that govern expression of WT1 itself. To facilitate mapping of the WT1 promoter region and 5[prime] control elements the authors have determined the sequence upstream of the WT1 transcription unit. This includes the Wit-1 gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. 11 refs., 3 figs.},
doi = {10.1006/geno.1993.1355},
journal = {Genomics; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 17:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993},
month = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993}
}
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