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Title: Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks from oxides of carbon and nuclear power

Abstract

A study has been made on converting alternative sources of oxides of carbon (CO and CO/sub 2/) to synthetic methanol with nuclear power generated electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen. The sources of CO and CO/sub 2/ include (1) the oxygen blown blast furnace which produces CO as a by-product from hot metal production, (2) the steam calcination of limestone which produces CO/sub 2/ as a by-product of the lime and cement industry, (3) fossil fuel power plant stack gas as a source of CO/sub 2/ and, (4) the atmosphere, from which CO/sub 2/ is recovered in a novel carbonate electrolytic cell. The recovered CO or CO/sub 2/ is catalytically combined with electrolytic H/sub 2/ to produce the synthetic fuels. In these systems, the conservation, efficiency, and environmental control of coal utilization is significantly improved. Blast furnace CO could supply up to 20 percent of the gasoline demand in the US at a 1985 cost of 56 to 60 cents/gallon, breaking even with $19/Bbl imported oil. The CO/sub 2/ from steam calcination of limestone could supply about 9 percent of the gasoline demand and the recovered CO/sub 2/ from only 60 percent of the coal fired powered plants in the country couldmore » supply all of todays gasoline demand in the country (approximately 100 billion gallons/yr). The 1985 cost estimates for carbon dioxide based gasoline range from 68 cents/gallon for the highly concentrated calciner CO/sub 2/ feedstream to 83 cents/gallon for the very dilute atmospheric CO/sub 2/ feed, breaking even with $21 to $28/barrel oil for conventional gasoline. The dominating cost factor is the electrical power cost from the nuclear plant. The sharing of peaking and base load costs between the power and synthetic fuels consumers offers a cost and energy effective system.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
7220354
Report Number(s):
BNL-22785; CONF-770804-4
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-76-C-02-0016
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. intersociety energy conversion engineering conference, Washington, DC, USA, 28 Aug 1977
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; CHEMICAL FEEDSTOCKS; SYNTHESIS; SYNTHETIC FUELS; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON MONOXIDE; ECONOMICS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; GASOLINE; HYDROGENATION; METHANOL; NUCLEAR POWER; OFF-PEAK POWER; PROCESS HEAT REACTORS; RECOVERY; ALCOHOLS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ELECTRIC POWER; FUELS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POWER; REACTORS; 090121* - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Chemical Synthesis- (1976-1989); 090222 - Alcohol Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989)

Citation Formats

Steinberg, Meyer. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks from oxides of carbon and nuclear power. United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Steinberg, Meyer. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks from oxides of carbon and nuclear power. United States.
Steinberg, Meyer. Tue . "Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks from oxides of carbon and nuclear power". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7220354.
@article{osti_7220354,
title = {Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks from oxides of carbon and nuclear power},
author = {Steinberg, Meyer},
abstractNote = {A study has been made on converting alternative sources of oxides of carbon (CO and CO/sub 2/) to synthetic methanol with nuclear power generated electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen. The sources of CO and CO/sub 2/ include (1) the oxygen blown blast furnace which produces CO as a by-product from hot metal production, (2) the steam calcination of limestone which produces CO/sub 2/ as a by-product of the lime and cement industry, (3) fossil fuel power plant stack gas as a source of CO/sub 2/ and, (4) the atmosphere, from which CO/sub 2/ is recovered in a novel carbonate electrolytic cell. The recovered CO or CO/sub 2/ is catalytically combined with electrolytic H/sub 2/ to produce the synthetic fuels. In these systems, the conservation, efficiency, and environmental control of coal utilization is significantly improved. Blast furnace CO could supply up to 20 percent of the gasoline demand in the US at a 1985 cost of 56 to 60 cents/gallon, breaking even with $19/Bbl imported oil. The CO/sub 2/ from steam calcination of limestone could supply about 9 percent of the gasoline demand and the recovered CO/sub 2/ from only 60 percent of the coal fired powered plants in the country could supply all of todays gasoline demand in the country (approximately 100 billion gallons/yr). The 1985 cost estimates for carbon dioxide based gasoline range from 68 cents/gallon for the highly concentrated calciner CO/sub 2/ feedstream to 83 cents/gallon for the very dilute atmospheric CO/sub 2/ feed, breaking even with $21 to $28/barrel oil for conventional gasoline. The dominating cost factor is the electrical power cost from the nuclear plant. The sharing of peaking and base load costs between the power and synthetic fuels consumers offers a cost and energy effective system.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1977},
month = {3}
}

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