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Title: Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model

Abstract

Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville
OSTI Identifier:
7190473
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: South. Med. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 76:12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FEMUR; BLOOD FLOW; MEASURING METHODS; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING; STEROIDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CHEMOTHERAPY; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; MICROSPHERES; RABBITS; TIME DEPENDENCE; ANIMALS; BODY; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; MAMMALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; SKELETON; THERAPY; VERTEBRATES; 550901* - Pathology- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Wang, G.J., Hubbard, S.L., Reger, S.I., Miller, E.D., and Stamp, W.G. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1097/00007611-198312000-00018.
Wang, G.J., Hubbard, S.L., Reger, S.I., Miller, E.D., & Stamp, W.G. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model. United States. doi:10.1097/00007611-198312000-00018.
Wang, G.J., Hubbard, S.L., Reger, S.I., Miller, E.D., and Stamp, W.G. 1983. "Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model". United States. doi:10.1097/00007611-198312000-00018.
@article{osti_7190473,
title = {Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model},
author = {Wang, G.J. and Hubbard, S.L. and Reger, S.I. and Miller, E.D. and Stamp, W.G.},
abstractNote = {Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings.},
doi = {10.1097/00007611-198312000-00018},
journal = {South. Med. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 76:12,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month =
}
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