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Title: Beer improves copper metabolism and increases longevity in Cu-deficient rats

Abstract

Moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages decreases risk of death from ischemic heart disease (IHD). Evidence suggests that Cu-deficiency is important in the etiology and pathophysiology of IHD. The effect of beer (25 ng Cu/ml) drinking on the severity of Cu-deficiency was examined in weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low Cu diet (0.84 {mu}g Cu/g). Beer drinking increased median longevity to 204 or 299 d from 62 or 42 d respectively in rats drinking water in two experiments (15 rats/group). In experiment 3, a single dose of {sup 67}Cu (3.3 {mu}Ci as chloride) was added to 1 g of feed and given to 12-h fasted rats 30 d after the start of the experiment. Whole body counting over 13 d showed apparent Cu absorption and t{sub {1/2}} (biological) were greater in Cu-deficient rats drinking beer than in similar rats drinking water. Plasma cholesterol was lower but hematocrit and liver Cu were higher in surviving rats drinking beer than in rats drinking water. Body weight was not affected by beer in any experiment. In experiment 4, a 4% aqueous ethanol solution had no effect on longevity of copper deficient rats. A non-alcohol component of beer alters Cu metabolism and mitigates themore » severity of nutritional Cu-deficiency in rats.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Dept. of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7189548
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3:3; Journal ID: ISSN 0892-6638
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; BEVERAGES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; COPPER; METABOLISM; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; COPPER 67; ETHANOL; ETIOLOGY; NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY; RATS; WHOLE-BODY COUNTING; ALCOHOLS; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; COPPER ISOTOPES; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; FOOD; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; METALS; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 560162 - Radionuclide Effects, Kinetics, & Toxicology- Animals, Plants, Microorganisms, & Cells

Citation Formats

Moore, R J, and Klevay, L M. Beer improves copper metabolism and increases longevity in Cu-deficient rats. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Moore, R J, & Klevay, L M. Beer improves copper metabolism and increases longevity in Cu-deficient rats. United States.
Moore, R J, and Klevay, L M. Thu . "Beer improves copper metabolism and increases longevity in Cu-deficient rats". United States.
@article{osti_7189548,
title = {Beer improves copper metabolism and increases longevity in Cu-deficient rats},
author = {Moore, R J and Klevay, L M},
abstractNote = {Moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages decreases risk of death from ischemic heart disease (IHD). Evidence suggests that Cu-deficiency is important in the etiology and pathophysiology of IHD. The effect of beer (25 ng Cu/ml) drinking on the severity of Cu-deficiency was examined in weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low Cu diet (0.84 {mu}g Cu/g). Beer drinking increased median longevity to 204 or 299 d from 62 or 42 d respectively in rats drinking water in two experiments (15 rats/group). In experiment 3, a single dose of {sup 67}Cu (3.3 {mu}Ci as chloride) was added to 1 g of feed and given to 12-h fasted rats 30 d after the start of the experiment. Whole body counting over 13 d showed apparent Cu absorption and t{sub {1/2}} (biological) were greater in Cu-deficient rats drinking beer than in similar rats drinking water. Plasma cholesterol was lower but hematocrit and liver Cu were higher in surviving rats drinking beer than in rats drinking water. Body weight was not affected by beer in any experiment. In experiment 4, a 4% aqueous ethanol solution had no effect on longevity of copper deficient rats. A non-alcohol component of beer alters Cu metabolism and mitigates the severity of nutritional Cu-deficiency in rats.},
doi = {},
journal = {FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (USA)},
issn = {0892-6638},
number = ,
volume = 3:3,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {2}
}