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Title: Environmental change in Iceland: Past and present glaciology and quaternary geology, volume 7

Abstract

Environmental Change in Iceland not only challenges traditional interpretations of the glacial and post-glacial environmental history of Iceland, it offers exciting and coherent alternatives to the established viewpoint. The collection's good organizational quality ensures its use as a solid introduction to current knowledge and research in the late Quaternary glacial and archaeological history of Iceland. Several gaps exist, however, which the editors could have avoided by providing more data on vegetation history. The lack of pollen data is acknowledged by the editors, but some utilization of an ecosystem perspective would have enhanced the interdisciplinary nature of the volume.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (eds.)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7162909
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: From review by Wendy Eisner, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States), in Bulletin of the American Meterological Society, Vol. 73, No. 7, (Jul 1992)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ICELAND; PALEOCLIMATOLOGY; GLACIERS; QUATERNARY PERIOD; REVIEWS; CENOZOIC ERA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DOCUMENT TYPES; EUROPE; GEOLOGIC AGES; ISLANDS; PALEONTOLOGY; WESTERN EUROPE 540110*

Citation Formats

Maizels, J.K., and Caseldine, C. Environmental change in Iceland: Past and present glaciology and quaternary geology, volume 7. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Maizels, J.K., & Caseldine, C. Environmental change in Iceland: Past and present glaciology and quaternary geology, volume 7. United States.
Maizels, J.K., and Caseldine, C. 1992. "Environmental change in Iceland: Past and present glaciology and quaternary geology, volume 7". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7162909,
title = {Environmental change in Iceland: Past and present glaciology and quaternary geology, volume 7},
author = {Maizels, J.K. and Caseldine, C.},
abstractNote = {Environmental Change in Iceland not only challenges traditional interpretations of the glacial and post-glacial environmental history of Iceland, it offers exciting and coherent alternatives to the established viewpoint. The collection's good organizational quality ensures its use as a solid introduction to current knowledge and research in the late Quaternary glacial and archaeological history of Iceland. Several gaps exist, however, which the editors could have avoided by providing more data on vegetation history. The lack of pollen data is acknowledged by the editors, but some utilization of an ecosystem perspective would have enhanced the interdisciplinary nature of the volume.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 1
}

Book:
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