skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Biosorption of lead and nickel by biomass of marine algae

Abstract

Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales performed particularly well in this descending sequence: Fucus > Ascophyllum > Sargassum. Although decreasing the swelling of wetted biomass particles, their reinforcement by crosslinking may significantly affect the biosorption performance. Lead uptakes up to 370 mg Pb/g were observed in crosslinked Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum. At low equilibrium residual concentrations of lead in solution, however, ion exchange resin Amberlite IR-120 had a higher lead uptake than the biosorbent materials. An order-of-magnitude lower uptake of nickel was observed in all of the sorbent materials examined.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7162327
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States); Journal Volume: 43:11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ALGAE; GROWTH; LEAD; UPTAKE; NICKEL; RESINS; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; GENETIC VARIABILITY; REMEDIAL ACTION; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; ELEMENTS; METALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLANTS; POLYMERS; SURFACE PROPERTIES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Holan, Z.R., and Volesky, B. Biosorption of lead and nickel by biomass of marine algae. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.260431102.
Holan, Z.R., & Volesky, B. Biosorption of lead and nickel by biomass of marine algae. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260431102.
Holan, Z.R., and Volesky, B. Sun . "Biosorption of lead and nickel by biomass of marine algae". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.260431102.
@article{osti_7162327,
title = {Biosorption of lead and nickel by biomass of marine algae},
author = {Holan, Z.R. and Volesky, B.},
abstractNote = {Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales performed particularly well in this descending sequence: Fucus > Ascophyllum > Sargassum. Although decreasing the swelling of wetted biomass particles, their reinforcement by crosslinking may significantly affect the biosorption performance. Lead uptakes up to 370 mg Pb/g were observed in crosslinked Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum. At low equilibrium residual concentrations of lead in solution, however, ion exchange resin Amberlite IR-120 had a higher lead uptake than the biosorbent materials. An order-of-magnitude lower uptake of nickel was observed in all of the sorbent materials examined.},
doi = {10.1002/bit.260431102},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 43:11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Sun May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}
  • Biomass of nonliving, dried brown marine algae Sargassum natans, Fucus vesiculosus, and Ascophyllum nodosum demonstrated high equilibrium uptake of cadmium from aqueous solutions. The metal uptake by these materials was quantitatively evaluated using sorption isotherms. Biomass of A. nodosum accumulated the highest amount of cadmium exceeding 100 mg Cd[sup 2+]/g (at the residual concentration of 100 mg Cd/L and pH 3.5), outperforming a commercial ion exchange resin DUOLITE GT-73. A new biosorbent material based on A. nodosum biomass was obtained by reinforcing the algal biomass by formaldehyde cross-linking. The prepared sorbent possessed good mechanical properties, chemical stability of the cellmore » wall polysaccharides and low swelling volume. Desorption of deposited cadmium with 0.1-0.5 M HCl resulted in no changes of the biosorbent metal uptake capacity through five subsequent adsorption/desorption cycles. There was no damage to the biosorbent which retained its macroscopic appearance and performance in repeated metal uptake/elution cycles.« less
  • A fundamental study of the application of brown algae to the aqueous-phase separation of toxic heavy metals was carried out. The biosorption characteristics of cadmium and lead ions were determined with brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida. A metal binding model proposed by the authors was used for the description of metal binding data. The results showed that the biosorption of bivalent metal ions to brown algae was due to bivalent binding to carboxylic groups on alginic acid in brown algae.
  • Biosorption of the heavy metal ion Cd{sup 2+} by protonated nonliving brown alga Sargassum fluitans biomass was accompanied by the release of hydrogen protons from the biomass. The uptake of cadmium and the release of proton matched each other throughout the biosorption process. The end-point titration methodology was used to maintain the constant pH 4.0 for developing the dynamic sorption rate. The sorption isotherm could be well represented by the Langmuir sorption model. A mass transfer model assuming the intraparticle diffusion in a one-dimensional thin plate as a controlling step was developed to describe the overall biosorption rate of cadmiummore » ions in flat seaweed biomass particles. The overall biosorption mathematical model equations were solved numerically yielding the effective diffusion coefficient D{sub e} about 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s. This value matches that obtained for the desorption process and is approximately half of that of the molecular diffusion coefficient for cadmium ions in aqueous solution.« less
  • Biosorption of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) by six fractions of particle sizes, ranging from 0.063 to 1.4 mm of dry marine algal biomass of Sargassum fluitans and Ascophyllum nodosum, is examined. Equilibrium metal uptake by larger particles was higher than that by smaller particles in the order of Pb > Cd > Cu > Co > Zn > Ni for both biomass types, with S. fluitans sorbing slightly more than A. nodosum. Uptakes of metals ranged from the highest, q{sub max} = 369 mg Pb/g (particle size 0.84-1.00 mm), to themore » low Zn and Ni uptakes, q{sub max} = 77 mg/g (size 0.84-1.00 mm) for S. fluitans. A. nodosum adsorbed metals in the range from q{sub max} = 287 mg Pg/g (particle size 0.84-1.00 mm) to q{sub max} = 73 mg Zn/g (particle size 0.84-1.00mm). Harder stipe fractions of S. fluitans demonstrated generally higher metal uptakes than the softer fractions derived from its blades (leaves). The pH dependence of the Zn uptake by S. fluitans exhibited an S-shaped curve between pH 1.5 and pH 7, with 50% of the maximum (pH 7.0) uptake at pH 3.5. Monovalent Na and K ions at higher concentrations inhibited the biosorption of Zn by S. fluitans. A significant inhibition started at 50 mM potassium chloride or sodium acetate, and at 1M the biosorption was completely blocked. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • Biosorption of heavy metals is one of the most promising technologies involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. The kinetic modeling of copper biosorption by Arthrobacter sp. immobilized in a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-based matrix is reported in this work. The resin-biomass complex (RBC) has been used for copper biosorption in different conditions according to a factorial experiment. Factors investigated were cross-linker (trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) concentration, biomass concentration in the solid, and particles` granulometry. A maximum copper specific uptake of abut 7 mg of Cu/g of biomass (dry weight) has been observed, in the case ofmore » a RBC with the following characteristics: 2% (w/w) cross-linker concentration, 8% (w/w) biomass concentration, and 425--750 {micro}m granulometry. The shrinking core model has been used for the fitting of experimental data. A good fit has been found in the case of controlling intraparticle diffusion in all experimental trials. The copper diffusion coefficient in RBC has been estimated from the slope of the regression lines. Values obtained for the diffusion coefficients do not differ from one another with respect to the estimated standard error. An average apparent copper diffusion coefficient of about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s has been found.« less