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Title: Energy-efficient refrigeration and the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon use

Abstract

Two recent actions by the US Congress, passage of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) and ratification of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, have affected several large industries in the United States. Under NAECA, manufacturers of residential appliances must meet minimum energy-efficiency standards by specified dates. According to the Montreal Protocol, producers of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) must reduce the quantities of CFCs that they manufacture. CFCs have been identified as a cause of ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Since CFCs are used to improve the energy-efficiency of several appliance products, there is a potential conflict between the goals of reducing CFC use and improving energy-efficiency. In this article, the authors discuss the issues of CFC use, ozone depletions, energy-efficiency, and global climate change as they relate to residential refrigerators and freezers.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7154493
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annual Review of Energy; (USA); Journal Volume: 14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; REFRIGERATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; REFRIGERATORS; USA; NATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY ACT; CLIMATES; CONGRESSIONAL INQUIRIES; GLOBAL ASPECTS; OZONE LAYER; SAFETY; STANDARDS; BUILDINGS; COOLING; EFFICIENCY; LAWS; LAYERS; NATIONAL ENERGY ACT; NORTH AMERICA; 320106* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Equipment- (1987-); 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 291000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Conservation; 290300 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Turiel, I., and Levine, M.D. Energy-efficient refrigeration and the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon use. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.14.110189.001133.
Turiel, I., & Levine, M.D. Energy-efficient refrigeration and the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon use. United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.14.110189.001133.
Turiel, I., and Levine, M.D. 1989. "Energy-efficient refrigeration and the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon use". United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.14.110189.001133.
@article{osti_7154493,
title = {Energy-efficient refrigeration and the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon use},
author = {Turiel, I. and Levine, M.D.},
abstractNote = {Two recent actions by the US Congress, passage of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) and ratification of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, have affected several large industries in the United States. Under NAECA, manufacturers of residential appliances must meet minimum energy-efficiency standards by specified dates. According to the Montreal Protocol, producers of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) must reduce the quantities of CFCs that they manufacture. CFCs have been identified as a cause of ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Since CFCs are used to improve the energy-efficiency of several appliance products, there is a potential conflict between the goals of reducing CFC use and improving energy-efficiency. In this article, the authors discuss the issues of CFC use, ozone depletions, energy-efficiency, and global climate change as they relate to residential refrigerators and freezers.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.eg.14.110189.001133},
journal = {Annual Review of Energy; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 1
}
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