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Title: Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling

Abstract

A heavy drilling rig, cold stacked for several years, recently underwent numerous structural, equipment, and computer upgrades for drilling ultradeep (8,000 m) gas wells in Germany. The technical improvements on the rig included supplementary installations and modifications to safety, quality, engineering, noise abatement, and environmental protection systems. With a maximal hook load of 700 tons, the drilling rig is one of the heaviest of its kind in Europe. The rig has a drilling depth range of 7,000--8,000 m, and the top drive system enables horizontal drilling. The paper describes the rig site, mast, top drive, substructure, draw works, power station, mud system, instrumentation, and other equipment.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (ITAG Tiefbohr GmbH and Co., Celle (Germany))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7054333
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7054333
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil and Gas Journal; (United States); Journal Volume: 93:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; DRILLING RIGS; MODIFICATIONS; START-UP; DEPTH 6-9 KM; DESIGN; DIRECTIONAL DRILLING; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; NATURAL GAS WELLS; WELL DRILLING; DEPTH; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DIMENSIONS; DRILLING; DRILLING EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; EUROPE; WELLS; WESTERN EUROPE 030300* -- Natural Gas-- Drilling, Production, & Processing

Citation Formats

Noevig, T., and Gutsche, W.. Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Noevig, T., & Gutsche, W.. Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling. United States.
Noevig, T., and Gutsche, W.. Mon . "Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7054333,
title = {Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling},
author = {Noevig, T. and Gutsche, W.},
abstractNote = {A heavy drilling rig, cold stacked for several years, recently underwent numerous structural, equipment, and computer upgrades for drilling ultradeep (8,000 m) gas wells in Germany. The technical improvements on the rig included supplementary installations and modifications to safety, quality, engineering, noise abatement, and environmental protection systems. With a maximal hook load of 700 tons, the drilling rig is one of the heaviest of its kind in Europe. The rig has a drilling depth range of 7,000--8,000 m, and the top drive system enables horizontal drilling. The paper describes the rig site, mast, top drive, substructure, draw works, power station, mud system, instrumentation, and other equipment.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil and Gas Journal; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 93:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}
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