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Title: Microalgae are possible source of biodiesel'' fuel

Abstract

Researchers interested in developing renewable energy resources are investigating the use of single-celled algae--microalgae--as a potential source of lipids that could be converted into a diesel fuel substitute known as biodiesel. Progress in this effort was described at a symposium on photobiological and photochemical formation of fuels and chemicals sponsored by the Biotechnology Secretariat. The aim of NREL's Biodiesel from Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for large-scale production of oil-rich microalgae as well as methods to convert the microalgal lipids into liquid fuels needed for industry and transportation. A major goal is to use genetic engineering techniques to control the lipid production of microalgae. By manipulating culture conditions, researchers already can increase the lipid content of the microalgae cell from the 5 to 20% found in nature to more than 60% in the laboratory and more than 40% in outdoor culture.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7040282
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical and Engineering News; (United States); Journal Volume: 72:14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ALGAE; GENETIC ENGINEERING; PRODUCTIVITY; DIESEL FUELS; BIOSYNTHESIS; LIPIDS; AQUACULTURE; BIOTECHNOLOGY; DISTILLATES; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GAS OILS; LIQUID FUELS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM DISTILLATES; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLANTS; SYNTHESIS 090900* -- Biomass Fuels-- Processing-- (1990-); 550400 -- Genetics

Citation Formats

Baum, R. Microalgae are possible source of biodiesel'' fuel. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Baum, R. Microalgae are possible source of biodiesel'' fuel. United States.
Baum, R. 1994. "Microalgae are possible source of biodiesel'' fuel". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7040282,
title = {Microalgae are possible source of biodiesel'' fuel},
author = {Baum, R.},
abstractNote = {Researchers interested in developing renewable energy resources are investigating the use of single-celled algae--microalgae--as a potential source of lipids that could be converted into a diesel fuel substitute known as biodiesel. Progress in this effort was described at a symposium on photobiological and photochemical formation of fuels and chemicals sponsored by the Biotechnology Secretariat. The aim of NREL's Biodiesel from Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for large-scale production of oil-rich microalgae as well as methods to convert the microalgal lipids into liquid fuels needed for industry and transportation. A major goal is to use genetic engineering techniques to control the lipid production of microalgae. By manipulating culture conditions, researchers already can increase the lipid content of the microalgae cell from the 5 to 20% found in nature to more than 60% in the laboratory and more than 40% in outdoor culture.},
doi = {},
journal = {Chemical and Engineering News; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 72:14,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 4
}
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  • Biodiesel produces fewer pollutants than petroleum diesel, and is virtually free of sulfur. These properties make biodiesel an attractive candidate to facilitate compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). This fuel is ordinarily considered to be derived from oilseeds, but an essentially identical biodiesel can be made from microalgae.