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Title: Ocean Pollution Research Center

Abstract

The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7016156
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sea Technology; (United States); Journal Volume: 35:10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; OIL POLLUTION CONTAINMENT; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; FLORIDA; GULF OF MEXICO; OIL SPILLS; SOUTH ATLANTIC BIGHT; ATLANTIC OCEAN; CARIBBEAN SEA; CONTROL; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ECOSYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; POLLUTION CONTROL; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; USA 020900* -- Petroleum-- Environmental Aspects; 540320 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Not Available. Ocean Pollution Research Center. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Not Available. Ocean Pollution Research Center. United States.
Not Available. 1994. "Ocean Pollution Research Center". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7016156,
title = {Ocean Pollution Research Center},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.},
doi = {},
journal = {Sea Technology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 35:10,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}
  • Ocean pollution research and monitoring teams, responding to major oil spills as well as more subtle evaluations of toxic material, were coordinated under a Federal plan by the National Ocean Pollution Research and Development and Monitoring Planning Act. The Act called on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a five-year plan with biennial updates. The first plan failed to address whether Federal funding is adequate, but did set priorities among research subjects. The areas in Federal programs which need more emphasis, deemphasis, or which overlap are identified. Twenty-six tasks are assigned under the categories of program inventory,more » monitoring, technology development, quality assurance, and socio-economic impact. (DCK)« less
  • The history of oil-spill pollution cases is outlined and present legal systems for compensating private persons suffering loss are shown to be inadequate. A review of available state, national, and international systems points out gaps and suggests the possibility of Federal common law to fill those gaps. The courts can focus on whether federal statutes should protect coastal waters from oil pollution and whether uniform rules should be applied as a basis for new legislation. The case can be made for a uniform common law on the grounds that separate state policies could hinder U.S. compliance with international laws andmore » interfere with the need for a uniform decision mechanism in cases of pollution. Compensation to private individuals is logical in cases of economic damage to fishermen and other commercial property owners; but not logical as a private nuisance. 257 footnotes and references.« less
  • The dramatic growth in the use of flags of convenience by the maritime industry has become an issue of international concern. A variety of factors: including labor, tax, and environmental interests which impose higher operating costs; have pressured fleet operators to opt for vessel registration in those countries that impose only a minimum of regulation. Consequently, ships bearing a flag of convenience are often characterized by their poor conditions, inadequately trained crews, and frequent collisions. The authors discuss the international legal regime that allows convenient vessel registration, the effects that poorly regulated fleets have on the environment, and current multinationalmore » agreements that establish higher safety standards. They propose a multilevel regime to effectively deter continued environmental pollution by ocean vessels.« less
  • Man's wastes are polluting the oceans from various sources and delivered by various routes. The result has been the loss of habitat and the irreversible altering of marine ecosystems. Development in the coastal zones and offshore activities that disrupt biologically sensitive areas have led to international negotiations to regulate these impacts and develop a law of the sea. Basic to international cooperation, however, is the need to develop answers to questions about the ecological consequences of development programs and the carrying capacity of the oceans. Current information does not demonstrate long-term global impacts, making it difficult to detect and predictmore » incremental changes and causal relationships. Society needs to determine how much environmental damage it will accept and then to develop appropriate technology, such as biomonitoring. Society also needs to reexamine its positions on technology-based regulatory controls to see if the effects of cost-related tradeoffs are productive. (DCK)« less