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Title: Debate on hazardous air pollutants continues

Abstract

EPA Administrator William D. Rucklehaus has committed the agency to decide whether or not to list 20 to 25 of the 37 chemicals currently under consideration as potential hazardous air pollutants by January 1, 1986. A health assessment document will be developed for at least 15 of the substances in 1984. These include vinylidene chloride, epichlorohydrin, cadmium, mercury, beryllium, nickel, chlorinated benzenes, dioxin, asbestos, ethylene dichloride, ethylene oxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, methylene chloride, perchloroethylene. Proposed changes to section 112 of the Clean Air Act include: listing of any substance that is an air pollutant and has been classified by the National Toxicology Program as carcinogenic; requirement that an emission limitation include an ample margin of safety and rely on technical feasibility, rather than economic efficiency. EPA has released a document entitled ''Review and Evaluation of Evidence for Cancer Associated with Air Pollution'' for public comment. The report covers a wide range of mostly epidemiological studies which analyze the potential carcinogenicity of air pollutants.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Research and Technology, Inc.
OSTI Identifier:
7011822
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 18:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; RISK ASSESSMENT; BERYLLIUM; TOXICITY; CADMIUM; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; DIOXIN; MERCURY; NICKEL; POLLUTANTS; CARCINOGENESIS; CLEAN AIR ACT; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; HEARINGS; NEOPLASMS; REGULATIONS; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; AROMATICS; DISEASES; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELEMENTS; HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; LAWS; MATERIALS; METALS; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PATHOGENESIS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION LAWS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 500200 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Dowd, R.M. Debate on hazardous air pollutants continues. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1021/es00123a603.
Dowd, R.M. Debate on hazardous air pollutants continues. United States. doi:10.1021/es00123a603.
Dowd, R.M. 1984. "Debate on hazardous air pollutants continues". United States. doi:10.1021/es00123a603.
@article{osti_7011822,
title = {Debate on hazardous air pollutants continues},
author = {Dowd, R.M.},
abstractNote = {EPA Administrator William D. Rucklehaus has committed the agency to decide whether or not to list 20 to 25 of the 37 chemicals currently under consideration as potential hazardous air pollutants by January 1, 1986. A health assessment document will be developed for at least 15 of the substances in 1984. These include vinylidene chloride, epichlorohydrin, cadmium, mercury, beryllium, nickel, chlorinated benzenes, dioxin, asbestos, ethylene dichloride, ethylene oxide, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, methylene chloride, perchloroethylene. Proposed changes to section 112 of the Clean Air Act include: listing of any substance that is an air pollutant and has been classified by the National Toxicology Program as carcinogenic; requirement that an emission limitation include an ample margin of safety and rely on technical feasibility, rather than economic efficiency. EPA has released a document entitled ''Review and Evaluation of Evidence for Cancer Associated with Air Pollution'' for public comment. The report covers a wide range of mostly epidemiological studies which analyze the potential carcinogenicity of air pollutants.},
doi = {10.1021/es00123a603},
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 18:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 5
}
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