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Title: Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

Abstract

The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7004613
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Ecology; (United States); Journal Volume: 18:10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CHLORELLA; SENSITIVITY; TERPENES; TOXICITY; ALCOHOLS; ALDEHYDES; GROWTH; INHIBITION; ALGAE; CHLOROPHYCOTA; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; UNICELLULAR ALGAE; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Ikawa, Miyoshi, Mosley, S.P., and Barbero, L.J. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.1007/BF02751100.
Ikawa, Miyoshi, Mosley, S.P., & Barbero, L.J. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. United States. doi:10.1007/BF02751100.
Ikawa, Miyoshi, Mosley, S.P., and Barbero, L.J. 1992. "Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa". United States. doi:10.1007/BF02751100.
@article{osti_7004613,
title = {Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa},
author = {Ikawa, Miyoshi and Mosley, S.P. and Barbero, L.J.},
abstractNote = {The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.},
doi = {10.1007/BF02751100},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Ecology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 18:10,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month =
}
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