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Title: Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report

Abstract

The Big D Campground site is in Kingsville, Ashtabula County, Ohio. The site consists of a 1.2-acre landfill created out of a former sand and gravel quarry. From 1964 to 1976 the site owner accepted approximately 28,000 cubic yards of hazardous materials for disposal which included up to 5,000 drums containing solvents, caustics, and oily substances. A 1986 remedial investigation identified the landfill as the primary source of contamination in soil outside the landfill and ground water underlying the landfill. Ground water contamination is of significant concern because it is migrating towards the drinking water supply wells of nearby residences and Conneaut Creek which is adjacent to and south of the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE and TCE, other organics, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes removing and incinerating up to 5,000 buried drums, bulk wastes, and up to 30,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil followed by onsite disposal of nonhazardous ash residue; pumping and treatment of 40,000,000 to 60,000,000 gallons of ground water.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Emergency and Remedial Response
OSTI Identifier:
7000065
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7000065
Report Number(s):
PB-90-153719/XAB; EPA/ROD/R--05-89/101
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are not fully legible
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GROUND WATER; CONTAMINATION; OHIO; POLLUTION; SOILS; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; CHROMIUM; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; LAND POLLUTION; LEAD; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PROGRESS REPORT; REMEDIAL ACTION; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SITE SURVEYS; SOLVENTS; SUPERFUND; WASTE DISPOSAL; WATER POLLUTION; WATER SUPPLY; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION V; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; LAWS; MANAGEMENT; METALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION LAWS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; USA; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WATER 540220* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540320 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Not Available. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Not Available. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report. United States.
Not Available. Fri . "Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7000065,
title = {Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Big D Campground site is in Kingsville, Ashtabula County, Ohio. The site consists of a 1.2-acre landfill created out of a former sand and gravel quarry. From 1964 to 1976 the site owner accepted approximately 28,000 cubic yards of hazardous materials for disposal which included up to 5,000 drums containing solvents, caustics, and oily substances. A 1986 remedial investigation identified the landfill as the primary source of contamination in soil outside the landfill and ground water underlying the landfill. Ground water contamination is of significant concern because it is migrating towards the drinking water supply wells of nearby residences and Conneaut Creek which is adjacent to and south of the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE and TCE, other organics, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes removing and incinerating up to 5,000 buried drums, bulk wastes, and up to 30,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil followed by onsite disposal of nonhazardous ash residue; pumping and treatment of 40,000,000 to 60,000,000 gallons of ground water.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 1989},
month = {Fri Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 1989}
}

Technical Report:
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