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Title: Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere

Abstract

Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessitymore » of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6967541
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research; (United States); Journal Volume: 97:A9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AIRGLOW; ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DATA ANALYSIS; IONIC COMPOSITION; IONIZATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MOLECULES; NITRIC OXIDE; OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS; ROCKETS; THERMOSPHERE; CHALCOGENIDES; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; EVALUATION; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SPECTRA; 661320* - Auroral, Ionospheric, & Magnetospheric Phenomena- (1992-)

Citation Formats

Eparvier, F.G., and Barth, C.A. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.1029/92JA00993.
Eparvier, F.G., & Barth, C.A. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere. United States. doi:10.1029/92JA00993.
Eparvier, F.G., and Barth, C.A. 1992. "Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere". United States. doi:10.1029/92JA00993.
@article{osti_6967541,
title = {Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere},
author = {Eparvier, F.G. and Barth, C.A.},
abstractNote = {Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.},
doi = {10.1029/92JA00993},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 97:A9,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 9
}
  • A theoretical model of the composition of the earth's ionosphere has been constructed approximating photochemical equilibrium in the interval of altitudes 130-230 km. It is based on data on the neutral composition obtained in an experiment aboard the rocket ''Vertical-6.'' We compare calculated profiles of the ion concentrations which are obtained in this model with the ionic concentrations measured in the same experiment. In the model the ions O/sup +/, O/sup +/(/sup 2/D), O/sup +/(/sup 2/P), O/sub 2//sup +/, O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi..), N/sub 2//sup +/, N/sup +/, NO/sup +/, and He/sup +/ are examined. The results of the calculationsmore » show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.« less
  • The contribution of electron fluxes to the heating of the polar thermosphere during geomagnetic disturbances is estimated on the basis of direct simultaneous measurements of the structural parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, pressure) and soft corpuscular emission.
  • The authors review the results of six rocket of thermospheric nitric oxide and attempt to reconcile them with the available laboratory photochemical data. Specifically, they assess the impact of the recently revised recommendation for the N({sup S}) + O{sub 2} rate coefficient on photochemical models. Use of the new rate coefficient lead to a significantly enhanced production of NO, particularly at F region altitudes during solar maximum conditions. A comparison of photochemical calculations with the rocket profiles indicates that the new rate coefficient introduces a significant discrepancy which can be resolved if the recombination reaction of N + NO ismore » temperature dependent. The best fit value for the N + NO rate coefficient at thermospheric temperatures is 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp ({minus}(460 {plus minus} 60)T). The temperature dependence of this rate coefficient disagrees with the current recommendation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, but it is in better agreement with another, earlier laboratory measurement. Calculations using the proposed rate coefficient predict the NO solar cycle variation at 180 m to be less than at 140 km which is also in agreement with the observations. It is likely that the use of these new rate coefficients will affect calculations of the thermal budget of the upper atmosphere as well as the downward transport of NO into the middle atmosphere.« less