skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89

Abstract

An investigation of the hydrogeology and groundwater quality conditions near the Linn County Landfill, eastern Kansas was conducted from July 1988 through June 1989. The landfill is located in an unreclaimed coal strip-mine area near Prescott. Analysis of water levels from nine temporary wells and from strip-mine ponds indicated that groundwater flows southwest through the present landfill. A county road west of the landfill acts as a barrier to shallow westerly groundwater flow. Seasonal variations in the direction of groundwater flow may occur. Water samples from monitoring wells and a strip-mine pond were analyzed for inorganic and organic compounds. Iron, manganese, and dissolved-organic-carbon concentrations were good indicators of the presence of landfill leachate in the groundwater. Benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were also detected. None of the inorganic or organic compounds detected exceeded Kansas primary drinking-water standards. Chemical concentrations and water levels in some nested wells indicate there is a hydraulic connection between the strip-mine spoil material and the underlying limestone. Leachate-contaminated groundwater has the potential to migrate southwest corner of the landfill through either strip-mine spoil material or through the underlying Pawnee Limestone.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6965502
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 90-4117
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GROUND WATER; CONTAMINATION; KANSAS; WATER POLLUTION; SURFACE MINING; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; BENZENE; CARBON TETRACHLORIDE; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; GEOLOGY; HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY; HYDROLOGY; IRON; LEACHATES; MANGANESE; MONITORING; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; SPOIL BANKS; AROMATICS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DISPERSIONS; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION VII; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MANAGEMENT; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; MINING; MIXTURES; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; SOLUTIONS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; USA; VARIATIONS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WATER 010900* -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Environmental Aspects; 540320 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Falwell, R., Bigsby, P.R., and Myers, N.C.. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Falwell, R., Bigsby, P.R., & Myers, N.C.. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89. United States.
Falwell, R., Bigsby, P.R., and Myers, N.C.. 1991. "Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6965502,
title = {Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89},
author = {Falwell, R. and Bigsby, P.R. and Myers, N.C.},
abstractNote = {An investigation of the hydrogeology and groundwater quality conditions near the Linn County Landfill, eastern Kansas was conducted from July 1988 through June 1989. The landfill is located in an unreclaimed coal strip-mine area near Prescott. Analysis of water levels from nine temporary wells and from strip-mine ponds indicated that groundwater flows southwest through the present landfill. A county road west of the landfill acts as a barrier to shallow westerly groundwater flow. Seasonal variations in the direction of groundwater flow may occur. Water samples from monitoring wells and a strip-mine pond were analyzed for inorganic and organic compounds. Iron, manganese, and dissolved-organic-carbon concentrations were good indicators of the presence of landfill leachate in the groundwater. Benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were also detected. None of the inorganic or organic compounds detected exceeded Kansas primary drinking-water standards. Chemical concentrations and water levels in some nested wells indicate there is a hydraulic connection between the strip-mine spoil material and the underlying limestone. Leachate-contaminated groundwater has the potential to migrate southwest corner of the landfill through either strip-mine spoil material or through the underlying Pawnee Limestone.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Potentiometric-surface maps indicated groundwater movement from the northeast and northwest towards the landfill and then south through the landfill to the Cottonwood River. Chemical analysis of water samples from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the landfill indicate calcium bicarbonate to be the dominant water type. No inorganic or organic chemical concentrations exceeded Kansas or Federal primary drinking-water standards. Kansas secondary drinking-water standards were equaled or exceeded, however, in water from some or all wells for total hardness, dissolved solids, iron, and manganese. Water from one upgradient well contained larger concentrations of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, and smaller concentrations ofmore » bicarbonate, alkalinity, ammonia, arsenic, iron, and manganese as compared to all other monitoring wells. Results of this investigation indicate that groundwater quality downgradient of well MW-2 has increased concentrations of some inorganic and organic compounds. Due to the industrial nature of the area and the changing directions of groundwater flow, it is not clear what the source of these compounds might be. Long-term monitoring, additional wells, and access to nearby waste lagoons and waste-lagoon monitoring wells would help define the sources of increased inorganic and organic compounds. 28 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.« less
  • Chemical analyses of water from monitoring wells installed at locations upgradient and downgradient from the landfill indicate the presence of calcium bicarbonate, sodium chloride, and mixed calcium bicarbonate sodium chloride water types. For the dominant calcium bicarbonate water type, inorganic and organic constituents indicate the presence of r3educing conditions in the landfill, and increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, iron, manganese, and other trace elements downgradient within a leachate plume that extends northeasterly away from the landfill. The orientation of the long axis of the leachate plume does not coincide with the direction of groundwater flow,more » based on measurements of water-level altitude, possibly due to the effect of abundant rainfall and high river stages at other times of the year or preferential flow in very transmissive zones, and thus may indicate the dominant direction of groundwater flow. None of the organic-constituent or inorganic-constituent concentrations exceeded primary drinking water standards, but iron and manganese concentrations exceeded secondary drinking water standards. Concentrations of benzene, vinyl chloride, and 1,2-trans-dichloroethene exceeded Kansas notification levels. 28 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.« less
  • The purpose of the study was to describe the geology, hydrology, and ground-water quality in the vicinity of the Emporia-Lyon County Landfill. The study is one of several in Kansas that focus on the effects of landfills on the quality of water in shallow aquifers. The report presents information on current hydrogeologic and ground-water-quality conditions in the vicinity of the Emporia-Lyon County Landfill, including a description of regional geology and hydrology, a description of alluvial sediments penetrated during drilling of wells in and near the landfill, a description of hydrologic conditions in the alluvial sediments in and near the landfill,more » and a description of inorganic and organic ground-water chemistry for water samples from 13 monitoring wells in and near the landfill.« less
  • Chemical analysis of water from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the Geary County Landfill in Kansas near Junction City indicate the presence of several chemically distinct water types. For the dominant calcium bicarbonate water type, concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents indicate the presence of reducing conditions within the landfill and increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, iron, manganese, and other trace elements downgradient within a leachate plume that extends northeasterly away from the landfill. The orientation of the long axis of the leachate plume does not coincide with the August or September directions ofmore » groundwater flow, possibly due to the effect of abundant rainfall and high river stages at other times of the year or preferential flow in very transmissive zones, and thus may indicate the dominant direction of groundwater flow. None of the organic-constituent or inorganic-constituent concentrations exceeded secondary drinking-water standards. Concentrations of benzene, vinyl chloride, and 1,2-trans-dichloroethene exceeded Kansas notification levels. 28 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.« less
  • The report describes the physical setting of the Reno County Landfill, the fate of waste materials in landfills, in general, and investigate methods used. Data collected during installation of temporary and monitoring wells and subsequent water-level measurements are used to describe the geology and hydrology in the vicinity of the landfill. Analysis of samples from private-supply and monitoring wells, and from a nearby creek define water-quality conditions near the landfill and the effects of the landfill on ground-water quality.