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Title: Soybean and sunflower oil performance in a diesel engine

Abstract

The performance of a direct injection diesel engine operating on mechanically expelled-unrefined soybean oil and sunflower oil blende with number 2 diesel fuel on a 25:75 v/v basis was evaluated. The power output remained constant throughout 200 h of operation. Excessive carbon deposits on all combustion chamber parts precludes the use of these fuel blends, at least in the engine and under the specified EMA operating conditions.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0726
OSTI Identifier:
6956124
Report Number(s):
CONF-8606206-
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Summer meeting of the Society for Engineering in Agriculture: meeting the engineering challenges of agriculture worldwide, San Luis Obispo, CA, USA, 29 Jun 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; DIESEL ENGINES; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; PERFORMANCE TESTING; SOYBEAN OIL; SUNFLOWER OIL; COMBUSTION; CARBON; COMBUSTION CHAMBERS; DEPOSITS; DIESEL FUELS; FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS; MIXTURES; POWER GENERATION; QUANTITY RATIO; SCALING; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DISPERSIONS; ELEMENTS; ENGINES; ESTERS; FUEL SYSTEMS; HEAT ENGINES; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; LIPIDS; NONMETALS; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDATION; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; TESTING; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; TRIGLYCERIDES; VEGETABLE OILS 330102* -- Internal Combustion Engines-- Diesel; 090110 -- Hydrocarbon Fuels-- Properties-- (1979-1989); 330800 -- Emission Control-- Alternative Fuels

Citation Formats

Schlick, M.L., Hanna, M.A., and Schinstock, J.L. Soybean and sunflower oil performance in a diesel engine. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Schlick, M.L., Hanna, M.A., & Schinstock, J.L. Soybean and sunflower oil performance in a diesel engine. United States.
Schlick, M.L., Hanna, M.A., and Schinstock, J.L. 1986. "Soybean and sunflower oil performance in a diesel engine". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6956124,
title = {Soybean and sunflower oil performance in a diesel engine},
author = {Schlick, M.L. and Hanna, M.A. and Schinstock, J.L.},
abstractNote = {The performance of a direct injection diesel engine operating on mechanically expelled-unrefined soybean oil and sunflower oil blende with number 2 diesel fuel on a 25:75 v/v basis was evaluated. The power output remained constant throughout 200 h of operation. Excessive carbon deposits on all combustion chamber parts precludes the use of these fuel blends, at least in the engine and under the specified EMA operating conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • This paper compares the effects of using a 25 to 75 blend (v/v) of alkali refined sunflower oil and diesel fuel in a diesel engine as compared to a baseline test on diesel fuel. There were no significant problems with engine operation during the baseline test. However, problems were experienced while using the blended fuel. The major problems were (1) abnormal buildup on the injection nozzle tips, (2) injector needle sticking, (3) secondary injection, (4) carbon buildup in the intake ports, (5) carbon deposits on the exhaust valve stems, (6) carbon filling of the compression ring grooves, and (7) abnormalmore » lacquer and varnish buildup on the third piston land. 6 figures, 4 tables.« less
  • A methyl ester of sunflower oil was durability tested using the test cycle recommended by the Alternate Fuels Committee of the Engine Manufacturer's Association. The results are compared to a baseline test using diesel fuel. Based on the results, the methyl ester fuel successfully completed the 200-hour durability test.
  • The paper presents the results of a research project to evaluate performance and durability of direct injection turbocharged diesel engines using sunflower oil and blends thereof. Alcaline refined sunflower oil and three different blends of sunflower oil and diesel fuel were comparatively tested against No. 2 diesel fuel for: physical and chemical characteristics, fuel injection system performance, short term engine performance, propensity to nozzle deposits buildup, limited durability operation and low temperature starting capability. Results are presented for the various phases of the project and correlations between the fuel characteristics and engine accept-ability are discussed. 19 figures, 2 tables.
  • This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional dieselmore » combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.« less
  • Six fuels were blended to represent current and potential future quality Canadian diesel fuels, as defined by the Canadian General Standards Board. Steady state Caterpillar 3406 engine tests on these fuels showed that engine conditions, such as RPM and torque, have more influence than fuel quality on ignition delay and gaseous emissions. For example, increased cetane from 36 to 43 only slightly reduced nitrogen oxide emissions, while smoke, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions were unaffected. Ignition-improved and natural fuels of similar cetane and volatility provided equivalent cold starting performance and exhaust emissions.