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Title: Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options

Abstract

Mexico City, faces a severe air pollution problem due to a combination of circumstances. The city is in a high mountain basin at a subtropical latitude. The basin setting inhibits dispersion of pollution and contributes to frequent wintertime thermal inversions which further trap pollutants near the surface. The elevation and latitude combine to provide plentiful sunshine which, in comparison to more northern latitudes, is enhanced in the UV radiation which drives atmospheric photochemistry to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone. The Area Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico AMCW is defined to include the 16 delegations of the Federal District (D.F.) and 17 highly urbanized municipalities in the State of Mexico which border the D.F. The 1990 census (XI Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda de 1990) records that slightly over 15 million people live in the AMCM. There are numerous other nearby communities which are in the airshed region of Mexico City, but which are not included in the definition and population of the AMCM. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality management policies. The project utilizes a systems approachmore » including computer modeling, comprehensive measurement studies of Mexico City's air pollutants, environmental chemical reaction studies and socioeconomic analysis. Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are the designated lead institutions.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6954566
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-92-2919; CONF-9210178-1
ON: DE93000798
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Supercities international conference on environmental quality and sustainable development, San Francisco, CA (United States), 25-30 Oct 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR QUALITY; OPTIMIZATION; CARBON MONOXIDE; MONITORING; MEXICO; AIR POLLUTION; NITROGEN OXIDES; SULFUR DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; CLIMATE MODELS; EVALUATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; METEOROLOGY; OZONE; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CONTROL; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; LATIN AMERICA; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION CONTROL; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; 540150* - Environment, Atmospheric- Site Resources & Use Studies- (1990-); 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Streit, G.E. Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Streit, G.E. Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options. United States.
Streit, G.E. 1992. "Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6954566,
title = {Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options},
author = {Streit, G.E.},
abstractNote = {Mexico City, faces a severe air pollution problem due to a combination of circumstances. The city is in a high mountain basin at a subtropical latitude. The basin setting inhibits dispersion of pollution and contributes to frequent wintertime thermal inversions which further trap pollutants near the surface. The elevation and latitude combine to provide plentiful sunshine which, in comparison to more northern latitudes, is enhanced in the UV radiation which drives atmospheric photochemistry to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone. The Area Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico AMCW is defined to include the 16 delegations of the Federal District (D.F.) and 17 highly urbanized municipalities in the State of Mexico which border the D.F. The 1990 census (XI Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda de 1990) records that slightly over 15 million people live in the AMCM. There are numerous other nearby communities which are in the airshed region of Mexico City, but which are not included in the definition and population of the AMCM. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality management policies. The project utilizes a systems approach including computer modeling, comprehensive measurement studies of Mexico City's air pollutants, environmental chemical reaction studies and socioeconomic analysis. Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are the designated lead institutions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • Mexico City, faces a severe air pollution problem due to a combination of circumstances. The city is in a high mountain basin at a subtropical latitude. The basin setting inhibits dispersion of pollution and contributes to frequent wintertime thermal inversions which further trap pollutants near the surface. The elevation and latitude combine to provide plentiful sunshine which, in comparison to more northern latitudes, is enhanced in the UV radiation which drives atmospheric photochemistry to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone. The Area Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico AMCW is defined to include the 16 delegations of the Federal Districtmore » (D.F.) and 17 highly urbanized municipalities in the State of Mexico which border the D.F. The 1990 census (XI Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda de 1990) records that slightly over 15 million people live in the AMCM. There are numerous other nearby communities which are in the airshed region of Mexico City, but which are not included in the definition and population of the AMCM. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality management policies. The project utilizes a systems approach including computer modeling, comprehensive measurement studies of Mexico City`s air pollutants, environmental chemical reaction studies and socioeconomic analysis. Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are the designated lead institutions.« less
  • PM10, PM2.5, precursor gas, and upper-air meteorological measurements were taken in Mexico City, Mexico, from February 23 to March 22, 1997, to understand concentrations and chemical compositions of the city's particulate matter (PM). Average 24-hr PM10 concentrations over the period of study at the core sites in the city were 75 micrograms/m3. The 24-hr standard of 150 micrograms/m3 was exceeded for seven samples taken during the study period; the maximum 24-hr concentration measured was 542 micrograms/m3. Nearly half of the PM10 was composed of fugitive dust from roadways, construction, and bare land. About 50% of the PM10 consisted of PM2.5,more » with higher percentages during the morning hours. Organic and black carbon constituted up to half of the PM2.5. PM concentrations were highest during the early morning and after sunset, when the mixed layers were shallow. Meteorological measurements taken during the field campaign show that on most days air was transported out of the Mexico City basin during the afternoon with little day-to-day carryover.« less
  • An analysis of particulates, carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, and sewage produced by the airport was made, based on airport records on current traffic, predicted traffic increases, and published EPA emission factors, and was processed with a Burroughs B-6700 computer by using the SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Science) for the statistical analysis. The results show that the airport contributes 0.11% of Mexico City's total air pollution and that 75% of the commercial planes at the airport in 1974 generated 161,818 kg/mo of solid waste with 1.4 million l./mo of residual water. Installation of a sewage treatment plant is recommended.
  • Abstract not provided.