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Title: Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and escherichia coli in tropical freshwater

Abstract

The survival of Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli was studied in situ in a tropical rain forest watershed using membrane diffusion chambers. Densities were determined by acridine orange direct count and Coulter Counter. Population activity was determined by microautoradiography, cell respiration, and by nucleic acid composition. Densities of S. faecalis and E. coli decreased less than 1 log unit after 105 hours as measured by direct count methods. Activity as measured by respiration, acridine orange activity, and microautoradiography indicated that both bacteria remained moderately active during the entire study. After 12 hours, E. coli was more active than S. faecalis as measured by nucleic acid composition. In this tropical rain forest watershed, E. coli and S. faecalis survived and remained active for more than 5 days; consequently, both would seem to be unsuitable as indicators of recent fecal contamination in tropical waters.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;
  1. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6942334
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Crop Science; (USA); Journal Volume: 18:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; PATHOGENS; POPULATION DENSITY; WATER POLLUTION; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; CONTAMINATION; ESCHERICHIA COLI; FORESTS; FRESH WATER; STREPTOCOCCUS; TROPICAL REGIONS; WATERSHEDS; BACTERIA; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MICROORGANISMS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; WATER; 540311* - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- Radiometric Techniques- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Muniz, I, Toranzos, G.A., Jimenez, L., and Hazen, T.C. Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and escherichia coli in tropical freshwater. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Muniz, I, Toranzos, G.A., Jimenez, L., & Hazen, T.C. Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and escherichia coli in tropical freshwater. United States.
Muniz, I, Toranzos, G.A., Jimenez, L., and Hazen, T.C. Sun . "Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and escherichia coli in tropical freshwater". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6942334,
title = {Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and escherichia coli in tropical freshwater},
author = {Muniz, I and Toranzos, G.A. and Jimenez, L. and Hazen, T.C.},
abstractNote = {The survival of Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli was studied in situ in a tropical rain forest watershed using membrane diffusion chambers. Densities were determined by acridine orange direct count and Coulter Counter. Population activity was determined by microautoradiography, cell respiration, and by nucleic acid composition. Densities of S. faecalis and E. coli decreased less than 1 log unit after 105 hours as measured by direct count methods. Activity as measured by respiration, acridine orange activity, and microautoradiography indicated that both bacteria remained moderately active during the entire study. After 12 hours, E. coli was more active than S. faecalis as measured by nucleic acid composition. In this tropical rain forest watershed, E. coli and S. faecalis survived and remained active for more than 5 days; consequently, both would seem to be unsuitable as indicators of recent fecal contamination in tropical waters.},
doi = {},
journal = {Crop Science; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 18:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}
  • The survival of Streptococcus facecalis and Escherichia coli was studied in situ in a tropical rain forest watershed using membrane diffusion chambers. Densities were determined by acridine orange direct count and Coulter Counter. Population activity was determined by microautoradiography, cell respiration, and by nucleic acid composition. Densities of S. facecalis and E. coli decreased less than 1 log unit after 105 h as measured by direct count methods. Activity as measured by respiration, acridine orange activity, and microautoradiography indicated that both bacteria remained moderately active during the entire study. After 12 h, E. coli was more active than S. faecalismore » as measured by nucleic acid composition. E. coli and S. faecalis survived and remained active for more than 5 days. Consequently, both would seem to be unsuitable as indicators of recent fecal contamination in tropical waters.« less
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  • Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intactmore » cells.« less
  • Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar.more » The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.« less
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