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Title: Enhancement of broiler litter to improve the fertilizer quality of litter

Abstract

This document presents efforts to utilize poultry litter for feed, fertilizer, and soil amendments. Historical and programmatic efforts by TVA are discussed. Current methods of drying and pelleting the litter, along with more direct methods of composting are reported.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
TVA; Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6925051
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6925051; Legacy ID: DE93003912
Report Number(s):
TVA-Bull-Z-322; CONF-9210235--1
ON: DE93003912
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: National poultry waste symposium, Birmingham, AL (United States), Oct 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; USES; FERTILIZERS; PRODUCTION; COMPOSTING; FOWL; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; MATERIAL SUBSTITUTION; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY; ANIMALS; BIRDS; MANAGEMENT; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; ORGANIC WASTES; PROCESSING; US ORGANIZATIONS; VERTEBRATES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES 320302* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Materials; 553000 -- Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Ransom, J.M., and Strickland, R.C. Enhancement of broiler litter to improve the fertilizer quality of litter. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Ransom, J.M., & Strickland, R.C. Enhancement of broiler litter to improve the fertilizer quality of litter. United States.
Ransom, J.M., and Strickland, R.C. Wed . "Enhancement of broiler litter to improve the fertilizer quality of litter". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6925051,
title = {Enhancement of broiler litter to improve the fertilizer quality of litter},
author = {Ransom, J.M. and Strickland, R.C.},
abstractNote = {This document presents efforts to utilize poultry litter for feed, fertilizer, and soil amendments. Historical and programmatic efforts by TVA are discussed. Current methods of drying and pelleting the litter, along with more direct methods of composting are reported.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Conference:
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  • This document presents efforts to utilize poultry litter for feed, fertilizer, and soil amendments. Historical and programmatic efforts by TVA are discussed. Current methods of drying and pelleting the litter, along with more direct methods of composting are reported.
  • Development of prototype fireboxes intended to burn broiler litter is described. Details of a unit designed to burn pelleted litter and replace the oil burner on an existing boiler are provided.
  • North Carolina is one of the largest poultry-production states in the United States. Although a considerable amount of work has been done on methane production from livestock, brewery, and municipal wastes, little is known concerning poultry waste. Consequently, a laboratory study was conducted to delineate the potential for thermophilic (60/sup 0/C) methane generation from broiler litter. Broiler litter was chosen as the substrate for the following reasons: first, it is the most abundant waste of poultry production in North Carolina; second, wood chips which are used as the bedding material could be a potential source of carbon for methane biosynthesis;more » and third, it has a desirable nitrogen content of 3 to 4%, a level similar to that of the cattle waste..« less
  • In 1996, the production of broiler chickens in the US was approximately 7.60 billion head. The quantity of litter generated is enormous. In 1992, the Southeast region alone produced over five million tons of broiler litter. The litter removed from the broiler houses is rich in nutrients and often spread over land as a fertilizer. Without careful management, the associated agricultural runoff can cause severe environmental damage. With increasing broiler litter production, the implementation of alternative disposal technologies is essential to the sustainable development of the poultry industry. A process originally developed for the conversion of coals to clean gaseousmore » fuel may provide an answer. Catalytic steam gasification utilities an alkali salt catalyst and steam to convert a carbonaceous feedstock to a gas mixture composed primarily of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane. The low to medium energy content gas produced may be utilized as an energy source or chemical feedstock. Broiler litter is an attractive candidate for catalytic steam gasification due to its high potassium content. Experiments conducted in UTSI's bench-scale high-pressure fixed bed gasifier have provided data for technical and economic feasibility studies of the process. Experiments have also been performed to examine the effects of temperature, pressure, and additional catalysts on the gasification rate.« less
  • Decomposition of senesced plant material is one of two critical processes linking above- and below-ground components of nutrient cycles. As such, it is a key area of concern in understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Just as root acquisition of nutrients from soils represents the major pathway for nutrient movement from the soil to vegetation, decomposition serves as the major path of return to the soil. For any given ecosystem, a long-term shift in decomposition rates could alter nutrient cycling rates and potentially change the structure, function, and even the persistence of that ecosystem type withinmore » a given region. There is wide-spread concern that decomposition processes would be altered in an enriched-CO{sub 2} world. What is lacking presently is sufficient experimental data at the ecosystem level to determine whether these concerns have merit. Two issues are discussed in this article: effects of carbon dioxide enrichement on foliar litter quality and subsequent effects on decomposition rates. The focus is primarily on nitrogen because in many terrestrial ecosystems, nitrogen is the major nutrient limiting plant growth and experimental results from diverse ecosystem types have demonstrated that nitrogen concentrations are consistently reduced in green foliage produced at elevated carbon dioxide. Methodological questions are also discussed.« less