skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 86-519-1874, Ensco, El Dorado, Arkansas

Abstract

In response to a request from the Arkansas Department of Health, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ENSCO, El Dorado, Arkansas, where a hazardous-waste incinerator began burning polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in March of 1981. About 275 persons were employed at the facility, including 14 located some distance from the site and 50 outside truck drivers. Quantifiable amounts of PCBs were detected in all 41 air samples at concentrations from 0.85 to 40 micrograms per cubic meter (microg/cu m), with highest levels in the kiln dock area. All 56 surface wipe samples contained quantifiable amounts of PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) were found in five of five surface wipe samples. Serum PCB levels ranged from 2 to 385 parts per billion (ppb), with 18ppb being the median. The authors conclude that environmental and medical data document excessive exposure to PCB, and environmental data document the presence of PCDF and PCDD. The authors recommend that engineering controls, work practices, personal protective equipment and exposure monitoring be used to limit exposures.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6923561
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6923561
Report Number(s):
PB-88-221247/XAB; HETA-86-519-1874
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; DIOXIN; MONITORING; FURANS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INCINERATORS; ARKANSAS; EVALUATION; HAZARDS; AROMATICS; FEDERAL REGION VI; HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; MATERIALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; USA 552000* -- Public Health; 320305 -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Industrial Waste Management; 320604 -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Municipalities & Community Systems-- Municipal Waste Management-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Singal, M., and Roper, P. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 86-519-1874, Ensco, El Dorado, Arkansas. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Singal, M., & Roper, P. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 86-519-1874, Ensco, El Dorado, Arkansas. United States.
Singal, M., and Roper, P. Mon . "Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 86-519-1874, Ensco, El Dorado, Arkansas". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6923561,
title = {Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 86-519-1874, Ensco, El Dorado, Arkansas},
author = {Singal, M. and Roper, P.},
abstractNote = {In response to a request from the Arkansas Department of Health, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ENSCO, El Dorado, Arkansas, where a hazardous-waste incinerator began burning polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in March of 1981. About 275 persons were employed at the facility, including 14 located some distance from the site and 50 outside truck drivers. Quantifiable amounts of PCBs were detected in all 41 air samples at concentrations from 0.85 to 40 micrograms per cubic meter (microg/cu m), with highest levels in the kiln dock area. All 56 surface wipe samples contained quantifiable amounts of PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) were found in five of five surface wipe samples. Serum PCB levels ranged from 2 to 385 parts per billion (ppb), with 18ppb being the median. The authors conclude that environmental and medical data document excessive exposure to PCB, and environmental data document the presence of PCDF and PCDD. The authors recommend that engineering controls, work practices, personal protective equipment and exposure monitoring be used to limit exposures.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • An investigation was made of health problems at the MonArk Boat Company, Monticello, Arkansas. MonArk manufactured aluminum and fiberglass boats. About 200 hourly production workers were employed at the site. Fiberglass-reinforced plastic-resin hulls were sprayed with a gel coat consisting of vinyl ester or polyester resins containing free styrene monomer and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide catalyst. Average exposures during the work shift to styrene vapor did not exceed recommended limits, but there were short-term exposures of 114 to 250 parts per million (ppm). Exposures to 13 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/mT) of chromates and 160 ppm of toluene exceeded recommended limits inmore » the spray painting area of the aluminum fishing boat facility. Exposures to methylene bisphenyl isocyanate(MBI) at 0.21 to 0.57mg/mT exceeded the OSHA limit of 0.2mg/mT. Methylene-bis(4-cyclohexylisocyanate) was found at 0.7 to 3.1mg/mT. An organotin concentration of 0.38mg/m3 was found during a 49-minute period. The author concludes that health hazards exist from exposures to styrene, chromates, toluene, isocyanates, and possibly organotin. The author recommends that efforts be made to improve use of personal protective equipment, educate the employees to the dangers, improve ventilation practices, and institute a medical surveillance program.« less
  • In response to requests from management of Bondar-Clegg located in Lakewood, Colorado and Sparks, Nevada, evaluations were made of exposure to lead in two fire-assay laboratories. Breathing zone and general room air concentrations of lead were measured at each facility. All eight samples taken at Lakewood exceeded the evaluation criteria of 0.05mg/cu m with the range being from 0.1 to 0.6mg/cu m. Of 14 samples taken at Sparks, nine exceeded the criteria, ranging from 0.01 to 0.49mg/cu m. Improvements were needed in the exhaust ventilation systems at each location. Medical evaluations of ten employees at Sparks showed blood lead levelsmore » within the OSHA regulatory limits. However, three workers were over 40 micrograms/deciliter, the limit for returning to a job that involves lead exposure. The authors conclude that a health hazard existed from overexposure to lead at these facilities. The authors recommend improvements in the ventilation system and an upgraded respirator program. All workers should be advised of the toxic properties of lead exposure. Workers in the assay department should shower and change clothes and shoes at the end of the day to prevent lead contamination from entering the home. Personal hygiene should be improved. Medical monitoring of workers should continue.« less
  • An assessment was made of possible exposure to the catalyst dimethylethylamine (DMEA) at the Winters Industry Foundry in Canton, Ohio, in response to a request from the Molders and Allied Workers Union, Local 154. Symptoms of vision disturbances consisting of blurred, foggy, or halovision had been reported by workers at the facility along with headaches and stomach pain. Long-term personal breathing-zone air samples were taken during the core-manufacturing processes and revealed the following airborne concentrations: DMEA, nondetectable to 29 mg/cum; respirable free silica, nondetectable to 1144 micrograms/cu m; methylene chloride, nondetectable to 4.7 mg/cu m; perchloroethylene, 2.2 to 6.4 mg/cumore » m; 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 451 to 764 mg/cu m; and total reactive isocyanate groups, nondetectable to 144 microg/cu m. No airborne concentrations of ammonia or nitrosamines were detected. Over 90% of the employees experienced at least one symptom or effect which was consistent with DMEA exposure. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists with regard to exposure to free silica. The authors recommend that concentrations of DMEA be kept as low as possible, although there are at present no regulations concerning safe levels of this chemical in the workplace.« less
  • Following a request from the manager of the Cumberland County Home Health Aid Service, Bridgeton, New Jersey, the facility was investigated for hazards related to previous incineration of plastic hospital syringes. The syringes were composed of polypropylene and butyl rubber, and investigations were aimed at determining symptoms related to exposure to the pyrolysis products carbonmonoxide, formaldehyde, acrolein, and crotonaldehyde; other possible factors (dust, ventilation); and wipe samples. Observations revealed probable recirculation of pyrolysis products into office areas, as well as a significant dust burden. Initial symptoms reported involved respiratory and mucous membrane irritation. Continuing symptoms included throat irritation, eye irritation,more » and rhinitis. The authors conclude that, in spite of negative wipe tests, the workers have probably had continued exposure due to the adherence of irritants onto dust particles. Recommendations include removal of all unnecessary mobile objects and cleaning of remaining objects with a HEPA filtering vacuum, complete cleaning of the entire building with mild detergent, and removal of all materials stored there by the hospital, since their presence would be a continued source of production and dissemination of dust.« less
  • In response to a request from the President of Simmons Industries, Inc. (SIC-2015), Siloam Springs, Arkansas, the ability of the local exhaust ventilation system in the hanging room of the poultry processing facility to protect chicken hangers from exposures to airborne organic dust was evaluated. Air quality analyses were conducted both at the Siloam Springs facility and at the similar facility of the same company located in Jay, Oklahoma. One of three 8 hour time weighted average (TWA) inhalable dust concentrations from the Siloam Springs facility exceeded the Threshold Limit Value of 10mg/cu m for particulates not otherwise classified. Threemore » similar samples taken at the Jay facility exceeded the limit. The Jay facility did not have a local ventilation system in operation. Endotoxin concentrations in all six of the TWA inhalable samples exceeded the recommended limit of 10 nonagrams/cubic meter (ng/cu m) at both facilities. Of the six samples, five exceeded 100ng/cu m, a level associated with spirometric evidence of acute airways obstruction. The authors conclude that exposures in the hanging rooms of both poultry processing facilities represented a potential health risk. The authors recommend that the exhaust ventilation system and work practices be changed to reduce exposures. A respiratory protection program should be implemented until dust exposures are controlled.« less