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Title: Technocrats and nuclear politics

Abstract

This book arrives in an age of growing unease and dissatisfaction with the reassurances, by the nuclear power industry, of the safety of its power stations. The book's central purpose is to examine the motivations and varied perceptions which have laid the foundation for Britain's contemporary civil nuclear industry. The author pays particular attention to the role and influence of technical experts in the shaping of decisions within their own industry and the implementation of those decisions at the government level. The author shows how, in the British model, ministers and civil servants tend to serve as policy arbiters who set the parameters within which the dynamics of special interest groups provide policy options. This book combines several current themes; the politics of nuclear energy; the role of professional experts; and the impact of and drive for privitization. It examines the process of modern British policy-making and nuclear power politics, and holds implications that reach far beyond Britain.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6897648
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; REVIEWS; UNITED KINGDOM; DECISION MAKING; ENERGY POLICY; NUCLEAR FUELS; PLANNING; POLITICAL ASPECTS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INDUSTRY; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; MATERIALS; REACTOR MATERIALS; WESTERN EUROPE 290600* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Nuclear Energy; 293000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Massey, A. Technocrats and nuclear politics. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Massey, A. Technocrats and nuclear politics. United States.
Massey, A. 1988. "Technocrats and nuclear politics". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6897648,
title = {Technocrats and nuclear politics},
author = {Massey, A.},
abstractNote = {This book arrives in an age of growing unease and dissatisfaction with the reassurances, by the nuclear power industry, of the safety of its power stations. The book's central purpose is to examine the motivations and varied perceptions which have laid the foundation for Britain's contemporary civil nuclear industry. The author pays particular attention to the role and influence of technical experts in the shaping of decisions within their own industry and the implementation of those decisions at the government level. The author shows how, in the British model, ministers and civil servants tend to serve as policy arbiters who set the parameters within which the dynamics of special interest groups provide policy options. This book combines several current themes; the politics of nuclear energy; the role of professional experts; and the impact of and drive for privitization. It examines the process of modern British policy-making and nuclear power politics, and holds implications that reach far beyond Britain.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Book:
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