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Title: Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

Abstract

Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6896753
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States); Journal Volume: 234
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; ANTARCTICA; GLACIERS; REMOTE SENSING; VELOCITY; ACCURACY; ICE; LANDSAT SATELLITES; MONITORING; ANTARCTIC REGIONS; POLAR REGIONS; SATELLITES 580100* -- Geology & Hydrology-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Lucchitta, B.K., and Ferguson, H.M.. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1126/science.234.4780.1105.
Lucchitta, B.K., & Ferguson, H.M.. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images. United States. doi:10.1126/science.234.4780.1105.
Lucchitta, B.K., and Ferguson, H.M.. 1986. "Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images". United States. doi:10.1126/science.234.4780.1105.
@article{osti_6896753,
title = {Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images},
author = {Lucchitta, B.K. and Ferguson, H.M.},
abstractNote = {Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.},
doi = {10.1126/science.234.4780.1105},
journal = {Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 234,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month =
}
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