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Title: MHD forced convection flow adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge

Abstract

The problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) incompressible viscous flow has many important engineering applications in devices such as MHD power generator and the cooling of reactors. In this analysis, the effects of viscous dissipation and stress work on the MHD forced convection adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge is numerically analyzed. These partial differential equations are transformed into the nonsimilar boundary layer equations and solved by the Keller box method. Numerical results for the local friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented for the pressure gradient parameter m, the magnetic parameter {xi}, the Prandtl number Pr, and the Eckert number Ec. In general, increasing the pressure gradient parameter m or the magnetic parameter {xi} or the Prandtl number Pr or decreasing the Eckert number EC increases the local Nusselt number.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Air Force Aeronautics Technology School, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of General Course
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
687515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; MHD GENERATORS; FORCED CONVECTION; NUMERICAL ANALYSIS; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ENERGY LOSSES

Citation Formats

Yih, K.A.. MHD forced convection flow adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1016/S0735-1933(99)00070-6.
Yih, K.A.. MHD forced convection flow adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge. United States. doi:10.1016/S0735-1933(99)00070-6.
Yih, K.A.. Sun . "MHD forced convection flow adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge". United States. doi:10.1016/S0735-1933(99)00070-6.
@article{osti_687515,
title = {MHD forced convection flow adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge},
author = {Yih, K.A.},
abstractNote = {The problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) incompressible viscous flow has many important engineering applications in devices such as MHD power generator and the cooling of reactors. In this analysis, the effects of viscous dissipation and stress work on the MHD forced convection adjacent to a non-isothermal wedge is numerically analyzed. These partial differential equations are transformed into the nonsimilar boundary layer equations and solved by the Keller box method. Numerical results for the local friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented for the pressure gradient parameter m, the magnetic parameter {xi}, the Prandtl number Pr, and the Eckert number Ec. In general, increasing the pressure gradient parameter m or the magnetic parameter {xi} or the Prandtl number Pr or decreasing the Eckert number EC increases the local Nusselt number.},
doi = {10.1016/S0735-1933(99)00070-6},
journal = {International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer},
number = 6,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}
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