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Title: The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology

Abstract

Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has had efforts underway to provide the radiation protection community with age-dependent dose coefficients, i.e.g, the dose per unit intake. The Task Group on Dose Calculations, chaired by the author, is responsible for the computation of these coefficients. The Task Group, formed in 1974 to produce ICRP Publication 30, is now international in its membership and its work load has been distributed among the institutions represented on the task group. This paper discusses: (1) recent advances in biokinetic modeling; (2) the recent changes in the dosimetric methodology; (3) the novel computational problems with some of the ICRP quantities; and (4) quality assurance issues which the Task Group has encountered. Potential future developments of the dosimetric framework which might strengthen the relationships with the emerging understanding of radiation risk will also be discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
684474
Report Number(s):
ORISE-99-0164-Vol.2; CONF-960536-PROC.-Vol.2
ON: DE99002904; TRN: IM9943%%165
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6. international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 7-10 May 1996; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1999; Related Information: Is Part Of Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2; S.-Stelson, A.T. [ed.] [comp.]; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B. [eds.]; Smith, F.B. [comp.]; PB: 401 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; DOSIMETRY; CALCULATION METHODS; ICRP; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION PROTECTION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; QUALITY ASSURANCE

Citation Formats

Eckerman, K.F. The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Eckerman, K.F. The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology. United States.
Eckerman, K.F. Fri . "The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/684474.
@article{osti_684474,
title = {The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology},
author = {Eckerman, K.F.},
abstractNote = {Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has had efforts underway to provide the radiation protection community with age-dependent dose coefficients, i.e.g, the dose per unit intake. The Task Group on Dose Calculations, chaired by the author, is responsible for the computation of these coefficients. The Task Group, formed in 1974 to produce ICRP Publication 30, is now international in its membership and its work load has been distributed among the institutions represented on the task group. This paper discusses: (1) recent advances in biokinetic modeling; (2) the recent changes in the dosimetric methodology; (3) the novel computational problems with some of the ICRP quantities; and (4) quality assurance issues which the Task Group has encountered. Potential future developments of the dosimetric framework which might strengthen the relationships with the emerging understanding of radiation risk will also be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1999},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1999}
}

Conference:
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  • Establishment of guidance for the protection of workers and members of the public from radiation exposures necessitates estimation of the radiation dose to tissues of the body at risk. The dosimetric methodology formulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to be responsive to this need. While developed for radiation protection, elements of the methodology are often applied in addressing other radiation issues; e.g., risk assessment. This chapter provides an overview of the methodology, discusses its recent extension to age-dependent considerations, and illustrates specific aspects of the methodology through a number of numerical examples.
  • This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (1 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), 20 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (2 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (5 rem yr{sup {minus}1}) coupled with a cumulative limit, inmore » rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation.« less
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  • From third Health Physics Society midyear topical symposium; Los Angeles, California, USA (29 Jan 1969). See CONF-690103P1. Determination of the body burden of and prediction of the dose to an individual who accidentally inhales a predominantly alpha-orbeta-emitting radionuclide frequently rests on the interpretation of excretion data. In order to relate the excretion data to the actual inhalation, the report of the Task Group on Lung Dynamics for Committee II of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was used as the basis for the derivation of equations for the calculation of the urinary and fecal excretion patterns expected subsequent tomore » an acute inhalation exposure to a radioactive aerosol. Because rapid interpretation of excretion data is often desirable, a computer code was developed which simplifies the application of the equations. The predicted excretion patterns are compared with excretion data from accidental human exposure cases. The effects of particle size and chemical state of the inhaled aerosol are examined, and the implications for in-plant air sampling and incident documentation are discussed. (auth)« less
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