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Title: Commercial building energy standards implementation: Myth vs reality

Abstract

Since the advent of building energy standards almost 20 years ago there have been numerous codes, standards, and regulations (herein after referred to as standards) developed, adopted, and applied to new commercial building design and construction. The development of these standards occurs primarily at the national level, while adoption and implementation occurs at the state and local levels of government. Many assume that the mere adoption of a standard ensures that compliance is achieved and energy conserving buildings automatically result from the process. This assumption accounts for the myth that all buildings are constructed in compliance with the adopted standard and in reality many are not. There are many different processes by which standards are adopted and actually implemented, and they directly affect how close reality is to the myth. The paper presents the different processes used throughout the US to adopt and implement building energy standards for new commercial buildings, reviews available studies on compliance, discusses the reasons for reduced compliance, and suggests programs to improve today's realities.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6829768
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6829768; Legacy ID: DE93004335
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-21282; CONF-920828--24
ON: DE93004335
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) summer study on energy efficiency in buildings, Pacific Grove, CA (United States), 30 Aug - 5 Sep 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES; COMPLIANCE; ENERGY MANAGEMENT; REGULATIONS; STANDARDIZATION; USA; BUILDINGS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; STANDARDS 320105* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Services-- (1987-); 291000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Conservation

Citation Formats

Conover, D.R., Jarnagin, R.E., and Shankle, D.. Commercial building energy standards implementation: Myth vs reality. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Conover, D.R., Jarnagin, R.E., & Shankle, D.. Commercial building energy standards implementation: Myth vs reality. United States.
Conover, D.R., Jarnagin, R.E., and Shankle, D.. Sat . "Commercial building energy standards implementation: Myth vs reality". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6829768.
@article{osti_6829768,
title = {Commercial building energy standards implementation: Myth vs reality},
author = {Conover, D.R. and Jarnagin, R.E. and Shankle, D.},
abstractNote = {Since the advent of building energy standards almost 20 years ago there have been numerous codes, standards, and regulations (herein after referred to as standards) developed, adopted, and applied to new commercial building design and construction. The development of these standards occurs primarily at the national level, while adoption and implementation occurs at the state and local levels of government. Many assume that the mere adoption of a standard ensures that compliance is achieved and energy conserving buildings automatically result from the process. This assumption accounts for the myth that all buildings are constructed in compliance with the adopted standard and in reality many are not. There are many different processes by which standards are adopted and actually implemented, and they directly affect how close reality is to the myth. The paper presents the different processes used throughout the US to adopt and implement building energy standards for new commercial buildings, reviews available studies on compliance, discusses the reasons for reduced compliance, and suggests programs to improve today's realities.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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