skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Phenomena that influence high ozone concentrations in the Paso del Norte area

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of analyses of meteorological and air quality data for the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study. The purpose of these data analyses was to develop an understanding of the significant chemical and physical processes which lead to high concentrations of ozone in the Paso del Norte study region which includes El Paso, TX; Sunland Park, NM; and Juarez, Mexico. This analysis has shown that the high ozone concentrations are a result of slow convective boundary layer growth, reduced convective boundary layer depth, light surface winds, and high morning surface ozone precursor concentrations. Overlying meteorological conditions observed during high ozone episodes include an upstream aloft high pressure system, aloft warming, and weak surface pressure gradients. The analysis has also shown that aloft carryover of ozone and ozone precursors does not significantly contribute to the surface ozone concentration. Furthermore, hydrocarbon and NO{sub x} data, although spatially limited, show that the system is most often NO{sub x} rather than VOC limited.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Sonoma Technology, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States)
  2. EPA, Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
679382
Report Number(s):
CONF-980632-
TRN: IM9940%%201
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 91. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, San Diego, CA (United States), 14-18 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 91. annual meeting and exhibition. Bridging international boundaries: Clean production for environmental stewardship; PB: [5000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; OZONE; TEXAS; NEW MEXICO; REGIONAL ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; HYDROCARBONS; NITROGEN OXIDES

Citation Formats

MacDonald, C.P., Roberts, P.T., Main, H.H., Dye, T.S., and Yarbrough, J. Phenomena that influence high ozone concentrations in the Paso del Norte area. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
MacDonald, C.P., Roberts, P.T., Main, H.H., Dye, T.S., & Yarbrough, J. Phenomena that influence high ozone concentrations in the Paso del Norte area. United States.
MacDonald, C.P., Roberts, P.T., Main, H.H., Dye, T.S., and Yarbrough, J. 1998. "Phenomena that influence high ozone concentrations in the Paso del Norte area". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_679382,
title = {Phenomena that influence high ozone concentrations in the Paso del Norte area},
author = {MacDonald, C.P. and Roberts, P.T. and Main, H.H. and Dye, T.S. and Yarbrough, J.},
abstractNote = {This paper summarizes the results of analyses of meteorological and air quality data for the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study. The purpose of these data analyses was to develop an understanding of the significant chemical and physical processes which lead to high concentrations of ozone in the Paso del Norte study region which includes El Paso, TX; Sunland Park, NM; and Juarez, Mexico. This analysis has shown that the high ozone concentrations are a result of slow convective boundary layer growth, reduced convective boundary layer depth, light surface winds, and high morning surface ozone precursor concentrations. Overlying meteorological conditions observed during high ozone episodes include an upstream aloft high pressure system, aloft warming, and weak surface pressure gradients. The analysis has also shown that aloft carryover of ozone and ozone precursors does not significantly contribute to the surface ozone concentration. Furthermore, hydrocarbon and NO{sub x} data, although spatially limited, show that the system is most often NO{sub x} rather than VOC limited.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was capturedmore » in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.« less
  • Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13, 1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were performed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1, 2, 4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11--13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawinsonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-levelmore » jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. The authors found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.« less
  • A comprehensive monitoring program for ozone precursors and air toxics in the Paso del Norte border area is planned by the U.S. EPA for the Summer of 1996. A pilot study was carried out in October 1995 in the Paso del Norte area (El Paso, Texas, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, and Sunland Park, New Mexico) to test the appropriateness of proposed sampling and analysis methods and to provide preliminary data to be used for planning the Summer 1996 study. Two monitoring sites were selected, one in Ciudad Juarez, and one in the El Paso area. Samples were collected every second daymore » from October 21 to October 31, from 0300 to 0900 hr using stainless steel canisters (for VOC in the C{sub 2}-C{sub 12} range), Tenax-TA solid adsorbent cartridges (for C{sub 8}-C{sub 20} hydrocarbons). DNPH impregnated C{sub 18} Sep-Pack cartridges (for carbonyl compounds) and Teflon impregnated glass fiber filters followed by PUF/YAD/PUF {open_quotes}sandwich{close_quotes} cartridges (for SVOC). This paper discusses the data set obtained from the analyses of these samples. 6 refs., 7 figs.« less
  • This paper summarizes the measurement campaigns of the 1996 and 1997 Paso del Norte Ozone Studies, the resultant data sets, and the findings and conclusions that arose from subsequent data analyses. The purpose of these data analyses was to develop an understanding of the significant chemical and physical processes that lead to high concentrations of ozone in the Paso del Norte study region which includes El Paso, TX; Sunland Park, NM; and Juarez, Mexico. High ozone concentrations resulted from a combination of conditions, including slow convective boundary layer (CBL) growth, reduced CBL depth, light surface winds, and high concentrations ofmore » ozone precursor at ground level in the morning. Synoptic-scale meteorological conditions observed during high ozone episodes included an upstream aloft high-pressure system, and aloft warming. Aloft carryover of ozone and ozone precursors did not significantly contribute to the surface ozone concentration. Furthermore, hydrocarbon and NO{sub x} data, although spatially limited, showed that the system is more often NO{sub x}-limited rather than VOC-limited.« less
  • This paper provides a summary of the nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) source apportionments performed at Desert Research Institute as part of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study. Version 8 of the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model was applied to a total of 2232 hourly automated gas chromatography (auto-GC) and 225 two-hour canister samples. The auto-GC system was operated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission at one site in central El Paso. Two-hour canister samples were collected five times per day at 0500--0700, 0700--0900, 0900--1100, 1100--1300, and 1500--1700 MST during intensive study periods at one urban and one ruralmore » site on each side of the border. Gasoline vehicle exhaust accounts for one-half to two-thirds of NMHC in Juarez and El Paso with highest contributions during the morning and afternoon commute periods. Emissions from diesel exhaust and propane buses are both 2 to 5% of NMHC in Juarez and less than 2% in El Paso. The average sum of liquid gasoline and gasoline vapor increases during the day in Juarez from 2% at 0600 to about 8% at 1600. Diurnal and day-of-the-week patterns in the liquid gasoline contributions are essentially identical to the corresponding patterns for motor vehicle exhaust. These patterns suggest that a large fraction of the liquid gasoline contribution is associated with tailpipe emissions rather than evaporative emissions from either vehicle or industrial sources. Additionally, the contributions of liquid gasoline are strongly correlated with vehicle exhaust with respect to wind direction. The sum of the two sources put the upper limit for tailpipe contributions at 60 to 70%t of NMHC.« less