skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Oil shale loss from a laboratory fluidized bed

Abstract

The rate of loss of dust from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed of Greenriver oil shale has been measured. The rate of loss of dust form raw shale in the bed was approximately 1%/min for the first few minutes and then decreased. The loss rate for retorted or burnt shale was 5 to 10 times higher. The rates for retorted and burned shale were nearly the same. The time required for a 10 wt% loss of mass was approximately 3 min for processed shale and 1 hour for raw shale. Particles left in the bed during fluidization lost sharp corners, but kept the original elongation. Dust lost by the bed has a very wide range of sizes and demonstrated a strong bimodal distribution of sizes. The bimodal distribution of particles is interpreted as resulting from two mechanisms of dust generation; fracture and wear.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6776594
Report Number(s):
CONF-8904193--
Journal ID: CODEN: OSSPD
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings; (USA); Journal Volume: 22; Conference: 22. annual oil shale symposium, Golden, CO (USA), 19-20 Apr 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; OIL SHALES; DUSTS; FLUIDIZED BEDS; IN-SITU RETORTING; PARTICLE SIZE; SCALE MODELS; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; IN-SITU PROCESSING; MATERIALS; PROCESSING; RETORTING; SIZE; STRUCTURAL MODELS 040401* -- Oil Shales & Tar Sands-- In Situ Methods, True & Modified; 041000 -- Oil Shales & Tar Sands-- Environmental Aspects; 040403 -- Oil Shales & Tar Sands-- Refining

Citation Formats

Taylor, R.W., and Beavers, P.L. Oil shale loss from a laboratory fluidized bed. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Taylor, R.W., & Beavers, P.L. Oil shale loss from a laboratory fluidized bed. United States.
Taylor, R.W., and Beavers, P.L. 1989. "Oil shale loss from a laboratory fluidized bed". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6776594,
title = {Oil shale loss from a laboratory fluidized bed},
author = {Taylor, R.W. and Beavers, P.L.},
abstractNote = {The rate of loss of dust from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed of Greenriver oil shale has been measured. The rate of loss of dust form raw shale in the bed was approximately 1%/min for the first few minutes and then decreased. The loss rate for retorted or burnt shale was 5 to 10 times higher. The rates for retorted and burned shale were nearly the same. The time required for a 10 wt% loss of mass was approximately 3 min for processed shale and 1 hour for raw shale. Particles left in the bed during fluidization lost sharp corners, but kept the original elongation. Dust lost by the bed has a very wide range of sizes and demonstrated a strong bimodal distribution of sizes. The bimodal distribution of particles is interpreted as resulting from two mechanisms of dust generation; fracture and wear.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The rate of loss of dust from a laboratory scale fluidized bed of Green River oil shale has been measured. The rate of loss of dust from raw shale in the bed was approximately 1%/min for the first few minutes, and then decreased. The loss rate for retorted or burnt shale was 5 to 10 times higher. The rate for retorted and burned shale were nearly the same. The time required for a 10 wt% loss of mass was approximately 3 min for processed shale and 1 hour for raw shale. Particles left in the bed during fluidization lost sharpmore » corners, but kept the original elongation. Dust lost by the bed has a very wide range of sizes, and demonstrated a strong bimodal distribution of sizes. The bimodal distribution of particles is interpreted as resulting from two mechanisms of dust generation: fracture and wear. Fracture of large particles sometimes produced fragments which were small enough to be blown out of the bed. These fragments were much larger than the individual mineral grains in the shale. The fracture mechanism was dominant in the case of raw shale. Dust in the smaller particle-size range was generated by wear. Wear was the dominant mechanisms in the case of burned shale, whereas, for retorted shale, nearly equal amounts of dust were generated by each mechanism. 13 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.« less
  • As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were alsomore » determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.« less
  • As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were alsomore » determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.« less
  • A quartz isothermal fluidized-bed reactor has been constructed in order to measure kinetics and oil properties relevant to surface processing of oil shale. The rate of volatile hydrocarbon evolution is measured with a flame-ionization detector. Oil yield and composition is determined via subsequent analysis. This work is an extension and expansion of that originally reported by P. H. Wallman and co-workers at Chevron. We are determining gas evolution kinetics, oil yield, and oil composition as a function of both oil shale parameters (e.g., particle size, grade) and fluidized-bed parameters (temperature, sweep gas composition and velocity, bed particle size). Various techniquesmore » are evaluated for ;measuring species-selective (as opposed to total hydrocarbon) kinetics; an ultimate goal is the development of diagnostic methods relating oil yield and composition to processing parameters.« less
  • A series of bench-scale tests was conducted to evaluate a dry, fluidized-bed, scrubbing process for removing acidic gases from incinerator flue gas. The acidic gases studied were sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, chloride, and phosphorous pentoxide. These gases were found to react readily with lime in a bubbling bed operating at 540 to 650/degree/C (1000 to 1200/degree/F). Superficial gas velocity, bed temperature, bed depth, sorbent type, and sorbent conversion strongly affected the degree of acidic gas removal. Sorbent utilization was inhibited by the occlusion of the particle surface by reaction products. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.