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Title: Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

Abstract

The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure [sup 85]Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce [sup 85]Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p[sub 6] state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the [sup 85]Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p[sub 8] energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 [times] 10[sup 5] sec[supmore » [minus]1] have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10[sup 6]. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by [sup 85]Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6770198
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6770198; Legacy ID: DE93013500
Report Number(s):
PNL-8629
ON: DE93013500
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; KRYPTON; FLUORESCENCE; METASTABLE STATES; KRYPTON 85; DETECTION; EXCITATION; ISOTOPES; LASERS; MULTI-PHOTON PROCESSES; OPTICAL PUMPING; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; ELEMENTS; ENERGY LEVELS; ENERGY-LEVEL TRANSITIONS; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; EXCITED STATES; FLUIDS; GASES; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; KRYPTON ISOTOPES; LUMINESCENCE; MICROSEC LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NONMETALS; NUCLEI; PUMPING; RADIOISOTOPES; RARE GASES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES 664200* -- Spectra of Atoms & Molecules & their Interactions with Photons-- (1992-)

Citation Formats

Whitehead, C.A., Cannon, B.D., and Wacker, J.F. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/6770198.
Whitehead, C.A., Cannon, B.D., & Wacker, J.F. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton. United States. doi:10.2172/6770198.
Whitehead, C.A., Cannon, B.D., and Wacker, J.F. Thu . "Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton". United States. doi:10.2172/6770198. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6770198.
@article{osti_6770198,
title = {Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton},
author = {Whitehead, C.A. and Cannon, B.D. and Wacker, J.F.},
abstractNote = {The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure [sup 85]Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce [sup 85]Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p[sub 6] state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the [sup 85]Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p[sub 8] energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 [times] 10[sup 5] sec[sup [minus]1] have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10[sup 6]. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by [sup 85]Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.},
doi = {10.2172/6770198},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {4}
}