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Title: Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation

Abstract

This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6726336
Report Number(s):
PNL-3582; TTC-0165
ON: DE83002634
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS; DAMAGE; CORROSION PRODUCTS; FUEL ELEMENT CLUSTERS; MATERIALS HANDLING; SPENT FUEL STORAGE; STORAGE; TRANSPORT; WATER COOLED REACTORS; FUEL ASSEMBLIES; FUEL ELEMENTS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS 050900* -- Nuclear Fuels-- Transport, Handling, & Storage

Citation Formats

Bailey, W.J., Pankaskie, P.J., Langstaff, D.C., Gilbert, E.R., Rising, K.H., and Schreiber, R.E.. Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.2172/6726336.
Bailey, W.J., Pankaskie, P.J., Langstaff, D.C., Gilbert, E.R., Rising, K.H., & Schreiber, R.E.. Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation. United States. doi:10.2172/6726336.
Bailey, W.J., Pankaskie, P.J., Langstaff, D.C., Gilbert, E.R., Rising, K.H., and Schreiber, R.E.. 1982. "Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation". United States. doi:10.2172/6726336. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6726336.
@article{osti_6726336,
title = {Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation},
author = {Bailey, W.J. and Pankaskie, P.J. and Langstaff, D.C. and Gilbert, E.R. and Rising, K.H. and Schreiber, R.E.},
abstractNote = {This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.},
doi = {10.2172/6726336},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.
  • This report summarizes economic differences between a DUCRETE spent nuclear fuel storage cask and a conventional concrete storage cask in the areas of handling, transportation, and capital requirements. The DUCRETE cask is under evaluation as a new technology that could substantially reduce the overall costs of spent fuel and depleted U disposal. DUCRETE incorporates depleted U in a Portland cement mixture and functions as the cask`s primary radiation barrier. The cask system design includes insertion of the US DOE Multi-Purpose Canister inside the DUCRETE cask. The economic comparison is from the time a cask is loaded in a spent fuelmore » pool until it is placed in the repository and includes the utility and overall US system perspectives.« less
  • A spent fuel logistics study was conducted in support of the US DOE program to develop facilities for preparing spent unreprocessed fuel from commercial LWRs for geological storage. Two computerized logistics models were developed. The first one was the site evaluation model. Two studies of spent fuel handling facility and spent fuel disposal facility siting were completed; the first postulates a single spent fuel handling facility located at any of six DOE laboratory sites, while the second study examined siting strategies with the spent fuel repository relative to the spent fuel handling facility. A second model to conduct storage/handling facilitymore » simulations was developed. (DLC)« less
  • Corrosion products, called ''crud,'' form on out-of-reactor surfaces of nuclear reactor systems and are transported by reactor coolant to the core, where they deposit on external fuel-rod cladding surfaces and are activated by nuclear reactions. After discharge of spent fuel from a reactor, spallation of radioactive crud from the fuel rods could impact wet or dry storage operations, handling (including rod consolidation), and shipping. It is the purpose of this report to review earlier (1970s) and more recent (1980s) literature relating to crud, its characteristics, and any impact it has had on actual operations. Crud characteristics vary from reactor typemore » to reactor type, reactor to reactor, fuel assembly to fuel assembly in a reactor, circumferentially and axially in an assembly, and from cycle to cycle for a specific facility. To characterize crud of pressurized-water (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs), published information was reviewed on appearance, chemical composition, areal density and thickness, structure, adhesive strength, particle size, and radioactivity. Information was also collected on experience with crud during spent fuel wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage. From experience with wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage, it appears crud spallation can be managed effectively, posing no significant radiological problems. 44 refs., 11 figs.« less