skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs

Abstract

Congressional failure to pass a Superfund reauthorization bill this fall disappointed environmental consulting and engineering companies, environmentalists and parties liable for site cleanups. The Clinton administration's reform bill was introduced in the House Feb. 3, six months overdue, only seven months before Congress' annual summer break and less than a year before mid-term elections. The House bill was revised in August, but reauthorization was declared a lost cause in October, when supporters faced the harsh political fact that Republicans would hold the line against passing a new law until after the November elections. Of the three major environmental laws overdue for reauthorization--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Clean Water Act and Superfund (officially, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act)--the Superfund law appears to have the best chance of making it through the 104 Congress successfully. The latest version of the administration-sponsored bill received wide-spread support from environmentalists, industry and environmental business groups as being more reasonable and fair than the existing law.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6674703
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Solutions; (United States); Journal Volume: 8:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; RESOURCE RECOVERY ACTS; IMPLEMENTATION; US SUPERFUND; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; LAWS; POLLUTION LAWS 290300* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Bishop, J. Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Bishop, J. Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs. United States.
Bishop, J. 1995. "Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6674703,
title = {Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs},
author = {Bishop, J.},
abstractNote = {Congressional failure to pass a Superfund reauthorization bill this fall disappointed environmental consulting and engineering companies, environmentalists and parties liable for site cleanups. The Clinton administration's reform bill was introduced in the House Feb. 3, six months overdue, only seven months before Congress' annual summer break and less than a year before mid-term elections. The House bill was revised in August, but reauthorization was declared a lost cause in October, when supporters faced the harsh political fact that Republicans would hold the line against passing a new law until after the November elections. Of the three major environmental laws overdue for reauthorization--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Clean Water Act and Superfund (officially, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act)--the Superfund law appears to have the best chance of making it through the 104 Congress successfully. The latest version of the administration-sponsored bill received wide-spread support from environmentalists, industry and environmental business groups as being more reasonable and fair than the existing law.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Solutions; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 8:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 1
}
  • Sen. Frank Lautenberg, subcommittee chairman, points out at the first hearing at Newark, NJ that EPA spent $1.6 billion but cleaned up only 5 national-priority sites in the first 5-year period of superfund. At the time of the hearing, EPA reports that some additional sites have been cleaned up - a total of 13 out of a total 951 national-priority sites; EPA estimates that as many as 2000 additional sites could be added to the priority list Sen. Lautenberg notes budget problems in that the Reagan Administration failed to obligate all the money appropriated for 1987 and contemplates spending toomore » little in 1988. The three Washington, DC hearings emphasized the following: (1) April 29 - clean-up contracts, cost recovery, and State cooperative agreements; (2) June 25 - clean-up standards; and (3) July 23 - manpower and program delay issues. For the 5 separate hearings, statements from 26 witnesses are included in this record.« less
  • This paper addresses the question of the proper role of government in the area of environmental regulation by examining both strengths and limitations of a corrective justice theory in its application to legal and social problems. The paper is divided into two parts, with the first being a discussion of the basic theory of environmental policy with focus upon the choice of ex post or ex ante remedies for a violation of environmental policy. Special attention is given to the legal aspects of large number cases. The second part is a detailed examination of the Superfund bill. The notice, liability,more » and taxation provisions of the bill are discussed in view of their relationships to victims of toxic materials release. (DLS)« less
  • The Superfund is notable in its attempt to charge the costs of environmental damage to those commercial interests that contributed to the damage. The approach should appeal to the Reagan administration's fiscal austerity program. It realizes the attendant costs to the benefits of our technologically productive society and recognizes that those costs must be paid either as environmental precautions or as cleanup costs, property damage, and disease. This article examines the major problems addressed by Superfund, describing the major provisions of the Act, discussing previously available remedies, and considering some of the problems that may arise with implementation. 126 references.
  • EPA will issue an RFP to initiate the SITE-005 solicitation for demonstration of technologies under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. This portion of the SITE program offers a mechanism for conducting a joint technology demonstration between EPA and the private sector. The goal of the demonstration program is to provide an opportunity for developers to demonstrate the performance of their technologies on actual hazardous wastes at Superfund sites, and to provide accurate and reliable data on that performance. Technologies selected must be of commercial scale and provide solutions to problems encountered at Superfund Sites. Primary emphasis in themore » RFP is on technologies that address: treatment of mixed, low level radioactive wastes in soils and groundwater; treatment of soils and sludges contaminated with organics and/or inorganics, materials handling as a preliminary step to treatment or further processing, treatment trains designed to handle specific wastes, are in situ technologies, especially those processes providing alternatives to conventional groundwater pump and treat techniques.« less