skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho

Abstract

Fifty-four pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) were radio-collared out of 232 captured on 3 winter ranges in southeastern Idaho. Radioed pronghorn were followed for up to 21 months each, from December 1975 through August 1977. Winter home ranges showed a difference (P < 0.005) in size among valleys the 1st winter and were different in size and location within valleys between years. Snow covered the ground 1 week earlier and lasted 3 weeks longer in 1975 to 1976 than in 1976 to 1977. Spring migration began more than 1 month earlier in 1977 than 1976, and appeared related to loss of snow cover on the winter ranges in both years. Distances that pronghorn migrated in spring 1976 were different among valleys (P < 0.05) but directions were, in general, upward to areas near the heads of the valleys. Summer home ranges of all radioed pronghorn averaged 2033 +- 322 (SE) ha. Yearlings wandered during summer and their home ranges were 2 to 5 times as large as ranges of adults. Fall migration in 1976 began after 1 October and was not prompted by snowfall. Percent moisture in vegetation is suggested as a stimulus for onset of fall migration, and snowfall is suggestedmore » as a factor influencing distance migrated and location of winter.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul
OSTI Identifier:
6668400
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76EV01332
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Wildl. Manage.; (United States); Journal Volume: 44:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANTELOPES; MIGRATION; BEHAVIOR; CLIMATES; HOME RANGE; IDAHO; RADIO EQUIPMENT; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; SEASONS; STORMS; WEATHER; ANIMALS; DISASTERS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; MAMMALS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; RADIATIONS; RUMINANTS; USA; VERTEBRATES 550100* -- Behavioral Biology

Citation Formats

Hoskinson, R.L., and Tester, J.R.. Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.2307/3808359.
Hoskinson, R.L., & Tester, J.R.. Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho. United States. doi:10.2307/3808359.
Hoskinson, R.L., and Tester, J.R.. 1980. "Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho". United States. doi:10.2307/3808359.
@article{osti_6668400,
title = {Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho},
author = {Hoskinson, R.L. and Tester, J.R.},
abstractNote = {Fifty-four pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) were radio-collared out of 232 captured on 3 winter ranges in southeastern Idaho. Radioed pronghorn were followed for up to 21 months each, from December 1975 through August 1977. Winter home ranges showed a difference (P < 0.005) in size among valleys the 1st winter and were different in size and location within valleys between years. Snow covered the ground 1 week earlier and lasted 3 weeks longer in 1975 to 1976 than in 1976 to 1977. Spring migration began more than 1 month earlier in 1977 than 1976, and appeared related to loss of snow cover on the winter ranges in both years. Distances that pronghorn migrated in spring 1976 were different among valleys (P < 0.05) but directions were, in general, upward to areas near the heads of the valleys. Summer home ranges of all radioed pronghorn averaged 2033 +- 322 (SE) ha. Yearlings wandered during summer and their home ranges were 2 to 5 times as large as ranges of adults. Fall migration in 1976 began after 1 October and was not prompted by snowfall. Percent moisture in vegetation is suggested as a stimulus for onset of fall migration, and snowfall is suggested as a factor influencing distance migrated and location of winter.},
doi = {10.2307/3808359},
journal = {J. Wildl. Manage.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 44:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}
  • Food habits of a population of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) at the Idaho National Engineering Labortory, Butte County, were studied. The 421 pellets examined yielded 2,436 prey items of at least 22 prey species. Invertebrates, largely insects, constituted 91 percent of the total prey items, but only 29 percent of the total biomass; mammals constituted 8 percent of the prey items, but 68 percent of the biomass. The prey were mostly nocturnal species; diurnal species were poorly represented.
  • The Late Triassic Higham Grit in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming is comprised predominantly of coarse to medium-grained sandstone and pebble conglomerate with minor mudstone. Lithofacies present include: massive to crudely horizontally bedded pebbly conglomerate (Gm), trough crossbedded sandstone (St), planar crossbedded sandstone (Sp), horizontally stratified sandstone (Sh), ripple crosslaminated sandstone (Sr), and finely laminated sandstone and mudstone (Fl). Deposition occurred in a South Saskatchewan/Platte River-type braided fluvial complex with the development of longitudinal bars and gravel lags (Gm), straight-crested transverse bars (Sp), and sinuous-crested transverse bars and dunes (St). Periodic, high-velocity flow resulted in development of upper flow regimemore » plane beds (Sh). Minor episodes of flood plain inundation produced overbank deposits (Fl). Application of the South Saskatchewan and Platte River braided stream models to the Higham Grit is in good agreement with provenance studies (Schmitt and Hazen, in preparation) which postulate a sediment source area in the Ancestral Rocky Mountains uplift, a distance of 500-700 km to the southeast. Sediment transport distances in both the South Saskatchewan and Platte braided fluvial systems closely approximate this distance.« less
  • A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) population nesting on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho utilized burrows excavated by badgers (Taxidea taxus) or natural cavities in lava flows as nesting sites. The size of the population was small (N = 13-14 pairs) in relation to the number of available nesting sites, suggesting that factors other than burrow availability limited this population. Rodents and Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatus fuscus) represented the primary prey utilized during the nesting season. This population demonstrated both a numerical (brood size) and functional (dietary) response to a decrease in the density of three species ofmore » rodents on the INEL during a drought in 1977. 11 references, 1 figure, 2 table.« less
  • One of the principal generalizations concerning structural geology in foreland thrust belts is that thrust faults climb to the surface by running parallel with incompetent units and cutting upsection (ramping) across competent members, thus forming folds in the hanging wall but not in the footwall. Detailed geologic mapping at the front of the Meade plate in the northern Blackfoot Mountains, southeastern Idaho, shows that this rule can be applied only to the initial phase of deformation. The initial forms of folds created over ramps in the basal decollement have strongly influenced the geometry of subsequent imbricate thrusts within the Meademore » plate so that later faults were locally required to cut downsection in the direction of translation.« less