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Title: Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks

Abstract

The Cask Standard Review Plan (CSRP) has been prepared as guidance to be used in the review of Cask Safety Analysis Reports (CSARs) for storage packages. The principal purpose of the CSRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of storage cask reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The CSRP also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past by the NRC staff in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-understood positions as the same safety issues arise in future cases. An applicant submitting a CSAR does not have to follow the solutions or approaches presented in the CSRP. However, applicants should recognize that the NRC staff has spent substantial time and effort in reviewing and developing their positions for the issues. A corresponding amount of time and effort will probably be required to review and accept new or different solutions and approaches.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Nuclear Safety Engineering, Sacramento, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6655681
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6655681; Legacy ID: DE89004708
Report Number(s):
UCRL-21137
ON: DE89004708
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; TRANSPORT; SAFETY; EVALUATION; SPENT FUEL CASKS; DESIGN; CRITICALITY; OPERATION; PLANNING; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; STORAGE; CASKS; CONTAINERS; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES 052002* -- Nuclear Fuels-- Waste Disposal & Storage; 053000 -- Nuclear Fuels-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Not Available. Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.2172/6655681.
Not Available. Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks. United States. doi:10.2172/6655681.
Not Available. Fri . "Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks". United States. doi:10.2172/6655681. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6655681.
@article{osti_6655681,
title = {Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Cask Standard Review Plan (CSRP) has been prepared as guidance to be used in the review of Cask Safety Analysis Reports (CSARs) for storage packages. The principal purpose of the CSRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of storage cask reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The CSRP also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past by the NRC staff in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-understood positions as the same safety issues arise in future cases. An applicant submitting a CSAR does not have to follow the solutions or approaches presented in the CSRP. However, applicants should recognize that the NRC staff has spent substantial time and effort in reviewing and developing their positions for the issues. A corresponding amount of time and effort will probably be required to review and accept new or different solutions and approaches.},
doi = {10.2172/6655681},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This draft regulatory guide supplies guidance for preparing the safety analysis report if the spent fuel storage installation is allocated with a civilian nuclear power reactor and spent fuel storage casks are used. (LHM)
  • Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste,'' of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations specifies the information to be supplied in applications for licenses to store spent fuel in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) or to store spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) installation. However, Part 72 does not specify the format for presentation of the safety analysis report (SAR). Guidance on the content of the SAR will vary, depending on the type of installation that is planned. This guide representsmore » a Standard Format that is acceptable to the NRC staff for the SAR required for the license application. Conformance with this Standard Format, however, is not mandatory. License applications with differing SAF formats will be acceptable to the staff if they provide an adequate basis for the findings required for the issuance of a license.« less
  • This draft regulatory guide provides guidance on the format and content of a Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR) for a spent fuel storage cask. There is no regulation that requires the submittal of a TSAR for spent fuel storage casks. However, is a specific cask were approved by the NRC for storage of spent fuel, the TSAR on that cask could be referenced other safety analyses. Applicants for license under Part 72 could use this information in their SAR. This would greatly reduce the cost and effort of developing an SAR. Casks used for storage of spent fuel on amore » reactor site could be those used for shipping spent fuel or could be those designed for storage only. Casks used for shipping must be licensed under 10 CFR Part 71, ''Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material,'' which requires stringent quality assurance and cask testing. Casks used for shipping or for storae only sould be approved by the NRC if their safety is demonstrated.« less
  • The Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for two spent fuel shipping casks were technically reviewed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The casks were designed by Transnuclear, Inc., for shipment of 85 Big Rock Point boiling water reactor fuel elements and 40 R.E. Ginna pressurized water reactor fuel elements from West Valley, New York, to Idaho Falls, Idaho. The intent of the review was to ensure compliance of the casks with the requirements the applicable Federal Regulations contained in 10 CFR Pt. 71 and allow issuance of Department of Energy Certificates of Compliance for transport by the Department of Energymore » Idaho Operations Office. The review was performed by a team of Oak Ridge National Laboratory staff assembled for their expertise in criticality analysis, shielding, metallurgy, nondestructive testing, thermal analysis, structural analysis, and containment. This report describes the review processes, the findings in each technical area, and the overall conclusion that a Certificate of Compliance could be issued for the proposed single shipment under the specified conditions and constraints.« less
  • The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a rangemore » of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.« less