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Title: Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology

Abstract

The chapter describes the evolution of air-pollution epidemiology over a period when changes in pollution technologies have both lowered total exposures and dispersed them over vastly greater areas. Since personal exposure and microenvironmental measurements are expensive, studies oriented toward measurements of total exposure will be smaller and more intensive. The shift in emphasis to total human exposure also will affect health risk assessment and raise difficult issues in the regulatory domain. Considering that outdoor exposures (for which EPA has a regulatory mandate) occur in the context of exposures from other sources, the potential effect of regulatory action would probably be small. The regulatory issues are even more difficult for particulate air pollution since cigarette smoking is the strongest determinant of indoor levels but the EPA lacks regulatory responsibility for cigarette smoke.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health
OSTI Identifier:
6655204
Report Number(s):
PB-88-246111/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; EPIDEMIOLOGY; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; TOBACCO SMOKES; PARTICULATES; REGULATIONS; RISK ASSESSMENT; AEROSOLS; AIR POLLUTION; BUILDINGS; COLLOIDS; DISPERSIONS; PARTICLES; POLLUTION; RESIDUES; SMOKES; SOLS 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 550900 -- Pathology

Citation Formats

Ferris, B.G., Ware, J.H., and Spengler, J.D. Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Ferris, B.G., Ware, J.H., & Spengler, J.D. Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology. United States.
Ferris, B.G., Ware, J.H., and Spengler, J.D. 1988. "Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6655204,
title = {Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology},
author = {Ferris, B.G. and Ware, J.H. and Spengler, J.D.},
abstractNote = {The chapter describes the evolution of air-pollution epidemiology over a period when changes in pollution technologies have both lowered total exposures and dispersed them over vastly greater areas. Since personal exposure and microenvironmental measurements are expensive, studies oriented toward measurements of total exposure will be smaller and more intensive. The shift in emphasis to total human exposure also will affect health risk assessment and raise difficult issues in the regulatory domain. Considering that outdoor exposures (for which EPA has a regulatory mandate) occur in the context of exposures from other sources, the potential effect of regulatory action would probably be small. The regulatory issues are even more difficult for particulate air pollution since cigarette smoking is the strongest determinant of indoor levels but the EPA lacks regulatory responsibility for cigarette smoke.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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