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Title: Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico

Abstract

Heavy metal pollution in water is generally associated with industrial and municipal discharges into rivers, estuaries and lagoons. Once metals are in the water column, they may be taken up by organisms, deposited in the sediments or remain for some period in the water itself. The deposition rate in sediments depends on, among other factors, metal concentration in surface sediments. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of coastal, estuarine and lagoon environments have been determined by many workers. For the past several years, we have been interested in determining trace and heavy metal concentrations in the lagoons in Mexico to establish the levels of metal pollution. The work reported here is the completion of our ongoing study in San Andres lagoon. San Andres lagoon is located north of two industrial ports, Tampico and Altamira. In this industrial zone, the basins of the Panuco and Tamesi Rivers are localized and have industrial effluent throughout the year. All these activities and the input of the Tigre River, which runs through an agricultural and cattle-raising region, may affect the biogeochemistry of the San Andres lagoon. In the present work, we report concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and Pbmore » in sediments of San Andres lagoon. The measurements were made in different seasons; Rain-84 (August-September 1984); North (October-December 1984); Dry (April 1985); and Rain-85 (April-June 1985). 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Universitaria (Mexico))
  2. (Texas A M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6643316
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6643316
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology; (United States); Journal Volume: 52:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COASTAL REGIONS; SEDIMENTS; METALS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; MEXICO; CONTAMINATION; CADMIUM; COBALT; COPPER; IRON; LEAD; MANGANESE; NICKEL; ZINC; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ELEMENTS; LATIN AMERICA; NORTH AMERICA; TRANSITION ELEMENTS 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Vazquez, F.G., Aguilera, L.G., and Sharma, V.K. Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1007/BF00197825.
Vazquez, F.G., Aguilera, L.G., & Sharma, V.K. Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico. United States. doi:10.1007/BF00197825.
Vazquez, F.G., Aguilera, L.G., and Sharma, V.K. Tue . "Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico". United States. doi:10.1007/BF00197825.
@article{osti_6643316,
title = {Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico},
author = {Vazquez, F.G. and Aguilera, L.G. and Sharma, V.K.},
abstractNote = {Heavy metal pollution in water is generally associated with industrial and municipal discharges into rivers, estuaries and lagoons. Once metals are in the water column, they may be taken up by organisms, deposited in the sediments or remain for some period in the water itself. The deposition rate in sediments depends on, among other factors, metal concentration in surface sediments. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of coastal, estuarine and lagoon environments have been determined by many workers. For the past several years, we have been interested in determining trace and heavy metal concentrations in the lagoons in Mexico to establish the levels of metal pollution. The work reported here is the completion of our ongoing study in San Andres lagoon. San Andres lagoon is located north of two industrial ports, Tampico and Altamira. In this industrial zone, the basins of the Panuco and Tamesi Rivers are localized and have industrial effluent throughout the year. All these activities and the input of the Tigre River, which runs through an agricultural and cattle-raising region, may affect the biogeochemistry of the San Andres lagoon. In the present work, we report concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and Pb in sediments of San Andres lagoon. The measurements were made in different seasons; Rain-84 (August-September 1984); North (October-December 1984); Dry (April 1985); and Rain-85 (April-June 1985). 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1007/BF00197825},
journal = {Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 52:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}
  • The San Andres Formation on the Northern and Northwestern shelves of the Midland Basin is a progradational stratigraphic unit consisting predominantly of carbonate facies. Lithofacies include dolomite, laminated anhydrite and dolomite, massive bedded anhydrite, limestone, salt, and red beds. These lithofacies represent depositional environments that include deep-water outer shelf, shallow-water inner shelf, shallow-water to emergent shoals, and a sabkha complex that comprises intertidal to supratidal algal mud flats, hypersaline lagoons or brine pans, and terrigenous mud flats. Deposition was cyclic; a cycle began with a transgression followed by a gradual shoaling-upward sequence. Cycles commonly terminated with subaerial exposure before renewedmore » transgression initiated a new cycle. Much of the dolomitization probably occurred during periods of subaerial exposure in schizohaline environments. Porosity probably was developed also during subaerial exposure. San Andres reservoirs of the Northern and Northwestern shelves yielded 12.7% of the total oil production for Texas in 1980. Trapping mechanisms are both structural and stratigraphic. 44 references.« less
  • In this study Direct evidence for subsurface dissolution of interstitial anhydrite in both dolomite grainstones and quartz sandstones includes: cleavage-related dissolution fringe on anhydrite crystal surfaces, and isolated remnants of optically continuous (formerly poikilotopic) anhydrite. Experimentally etched anhydrite surfaces exhibit features that directly compare to the dissolution fringe, whereas experimentally grown anhydrite does not. We deduced the following sequence of anhydrite dissolution within dolomite grainstones and quartz sandstones. Slow incipient dissolution began along the boundaries between anhydrite and adjacent minerals. From these intercrystalline boundaries, solutions penetrated anhydrite cleavages, leading to more rapid preferential dissolution perpendicular to the more prominent cleavagemore » planes. The widened cleavage planes, together with intercrystalline boundaries, acted as conduits for the removal of dissolved ions. In the final stage, as dissolving anhydrite borders retreated toward pore throats, dissolution slowed and was, again, restricted to intercrystalline boundaries. This process was then repeated in adjacent interstices.« less
  • Seismic reflection profiling is an important geophysical method for investigating the presence and architecture of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the subsurface. However, the seismic section is not the exact equivalent of a geological cross section. Understanding seismic reflections and the complex angular relationships often visible in seismic sections, e.g. reflection terminations, requires simulation of two-dimensional cross sections. We have measured P-wave velocity, porosity, density, and insoluble residue of 48 rock samples from outcrops of the Permian upper San Andres Formation, Last Chance Canyon, New Mexico in an effort to construct a realistic model of the spatial distribution of acoustic impedance. P-wavemore » velocity, saturated, ranges from 3.4 to 6.6 km/s; bulk density ranges from 2.4 to 2.8 g/cc; porosity ranges from 1 to 23%; and insoluble residue (non-carbonate fractions most of which is clay minerals) varies between 0 and 93%. Cross plots show that most of the variation in compressional wave velocity is explained by changes in porosity and insoluble residue. Sample subsets span the spatial, downdip and vertical, distribution of several individual hemicycles and show gradients of impedance, porosity and insoluble residue. Within these carbonate hemicycles, acoustic impedance gradually decreases downdip as a function of increasing porosity and insoluble residue. As a consequence, differences in impedance between hemicycles are not constant and change laterally along their contact. These observations suggest a significantly more complex spatial impedance distribution in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic shelf-margins than traditional models where genetically important stratal boundaries are assigned constant impedance contrasts and diachronous facies boundaries are represented by gradual changes in impedance.« less
  • This paper presents a case history of the design, implementation, and results of a tertiary polymer EOR injection project conducted by Phillips Petroleum Co. in their Hale and Mable leases located in the Vacuum (Grayburg-San Andres) field, Lea County, NM. Polymer is being injected at a relatively low concentration, and the paper concludes that, given the reservoir rock and fluid properties prevalent in the Hale and Mable leases, a low-concentration polymer flood is just as effective as a higher-concentration flood as long as the total pounds of polymer injected is the same.
  • To determine the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons in the components of a marine ecosystem one must first evaluate the relative quality of the hydrocarbons biosynthesized in the system. In this way it is possible to distinguish some of the biogenic hydrocarbons series occurring in marine organisms and sediments from those of fossil origin (Clark and Finley, 1973). Organisms possess specific biosynthetic pathways which favor the production of hydrocarbons in preferred size ranges. Crude oils and oil products, on the other hand, are wide range mixtures that contain molecules of different sizes in fairly even distribution. The primary purpose of thismore » study is to establish the distribution of biogenic n-paraffins in marine ''sea-grasses,'' benthic algae, invertebrates and recent sediments from Terminos Lagoon, Campeche, Mexico. Considering the uncontaminated nature of this coastal region the results of this study will provide a basis for the assessment of future man-induced alterations.« less