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Title: Parent material which produces saline outcrops as a factor in differential distribution of perennial plants in the northern Mojave Desert

Abstract

An area of 0.46 km/sup 2/ divided into six zones in the northern Mojave Desert transitional with the Great Basin Desert has been studied. Diversity is high among the perennial plant species within the 0.46 km/sup 2/ area. Common species for the two deserts that are present in the area studied are Atriplex confertifolia (Torr. and Frem.) S. Wats., Ceratoides lanata (Pursh) J.T. Howell, Grayia spinosa (Hook.) Moq., Ephedra nevadensis S. Wats. Some other species present include Lycium andersonii A. Gray, Lycium pallidum Miers, Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) Payne., Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Cov., Acamptopappus shockleyi A. Gray, and Krameria parvifolia, Benth. Some of the species are relatively salt tolerant and some are relatively salt sensitive. A total of 4282 individual plants were measured. There was considerable variation in distribution of the 10 dominant species present, apparently due to zonal variations of salinity dispersed within the study area. Correlation coefficients among pairs of the species for different zones illustrate interrelationships among the salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive species. Observations on an adjacent hillside with rock outcroppings indicate that the saline differences in this area are partly due to outcroppings of parent volcanic rock materials that yield Na salts uponmore » weathering.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles
OSTI Identifier:
6640548
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6640548
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Great Basin Nat.; (United States); Journal Volume: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; NEVADA; DESERTS; SHRUBS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SPECIES DIVERSITY; SOILS; SALINITY; CORRELATIONS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; ROCKS; WEATHERING; ARID LANDS; DATA; DISTRIBUTION; INFORMATION; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; PLANTS; USA; WESTERN REGION 510100* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Basic Studies-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Wallace, A., Romney, E.M., Wood, R.A., El-Ghonemy, A.A., and Bamberg, S.A. Parent material which produces saline outcrops as a factor in differential distribution of perennial plants in the northern Mojave Desert. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Wallace, A., Romney, E.M., Wood, R.A., El-Ghonemy, A.A., & Bamberg, S.A. Parent material which produces saline outcrops as a factor in differential distribution of perennial plants in the northern Mojave Desert. United States.
Wallace, A., Romney, E.M., Wood, R.A., El-Ghonemy, A.A., and Bamberg, S.A. Tue . "Parent material which produces saline outcrops as a factor in differential distribution of perennial plants in the northern Mojave Desert". United States.
@article{osti_6640548,
title = {Parent material which produces saline outcrops as a factor in differential distribution of perennial plants in the northern Mojave Desert},
author = {Wallace, A. and Romney, E.M. and Wood, R.A. and El-Ghonemy, A.A. and Bamberg, S.A.},
abstractNote = {An area of 0.46 km/sup 2/ divided into six zones in the northern Mojave Desert transitional with the Great Basin Desert has been studied. Diversity is high among the perennial plant species within the 0.46 km/sup 2/ area. Common species for the two deserts that are present in the area studied are Atriplex confertifolia (Torr. and Frem.) S. Wats., Ceratoides lanata (Pursh) J.T. Howell, Grayia spinosa (Hook.) Moq., Ephedra nevadensis S. Wats. Some other species present include Lycium andersonii A. Gray, Lycium pallidum Miers, Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) Payne., Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Cov., Acamptopappus shockleyi A. Gray, and Krameria parvifolia, Benth. Some of the species are relatively salt tolerant and some are relatively salt sensitive. A total of 4282 individual plants were measured. There was considerable variation in distribution of the 10 dominant species present, apparently due to zonal variations of salinity dispersed within the study area. Correlation coefficients among pairs of the species for different zones illustrate interrelationships among the salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive species. Observations on an adjacent hillside with rock outcroppings indicate that the saline differences in this area are partly due to outcroppings of parent volcanic rock materials that yield Na salts upon weathering.},
doi = {},
journal = {Great Basin Nat.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}