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Title: Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine

Abstract

This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center|[Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture
  2. Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center
  3. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
663528
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CDIAC-107; NDP-061A
ON: DE98006091; BR: KP1204010; TRN: AHC29818%%365
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Environmental Sciences Division publication number 4754; PBD: Mar 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; PLANT GROWTH; PINES; NUTRIENTS; NITRATES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; EXPOSURE CHAMBERS; AIR POLLUTION

Citation Formats

Johnson, D.W., Ball, J.T., Walker, R.F., and Cushman, R.M. Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/663528.
Johnson, D.W., Ball, J.T., Walker, R.F., & Cushman, R.M. Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine. United States. doi:10.2172/663528.
Johnson, D.W., Ball, J.T., Walker, R.F., and Cushman, R.M. Sun . "Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine". United States. doi:10.2172/663528. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/663528.
@article{osti_663528,
title = {Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine},
author = {Johnson, D.W. and Ball, J.T. and Walker, R.F. and Cushman, R.M.},
abstractNote = {This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.},
doi = {10.2172/663528},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.
  • The effects of elevated CO{sub 2} (ambient, 525, and 700 {micro}l l{sup -1})and N fertilization (0, 10, and 20 g N m{sup 2} yr{sup -1}) on soil pCO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} efflux, soil solution chemistry, and soil C and nutrients in an open-top chamber study with Pinus ponderosa are described. Soil pCO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} efflux were significantly greater with elevated CO{sub 2}, at first (second growing season) in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} and later (fourth and fifth growing seasons) in the 700 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatments. Soil solution HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations were temporarily elevatedmore » in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatment during the second growing season, consistent with the elevated pCO{sub 2}. Nitrogen fertilization had no consistent effect on soil pCO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} efflux, but did have the expected negative effect on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, presumed to be caused by increased nitrate leaching. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no consistent effects on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, but did cause temporary reductions in soil NO{sup 3{sup -}} (second growing season). Statistically significant negative effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on soil extractable P were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons. However, these patterns in extractable P reflected pre-treatment differences, which, while not statistically significant, followed the same pattern. Statistically significant effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on total C and N in soils were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons, but these effects were inconsistent among N treatments and years. The clearest effect of elevated CO{sub 2} was in the case of C/N ratio in year 6, where there was a consistent, positive effect. The increases in C/N ratio with elevated CO{sub 2} in year six were largely a result of reductions in soil N rather than increases in soil C. Future papers will assess whether this apparent reduction in soil N could have been accounted for by plant uptake.« less
  • The rapid increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} may alter patterns of C assimilation, allocation and sequestration; effects on roots being particularly important because they are a primary point of resource acquisition and uptake. The effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and nitrogen treatments on Pinus ponderosa fine roots and associated fungal structures were monitored for a two year period using a minirhizotron camera system The trees were grown in native soil in open-top field-exposure chambers at Placerville, CA and exposed to ambient air or ambient air plus either 175 or 350 {mu}mol mol{sup -1} CO{sub 2} and 3 levels of nitrogenmore » addition (0, 100 and 200 kg ha{sup -1}). The majority (>90 %) of roots observed were smaller than 2 mm and the mean diameter decreased during the study. Root production was greatest in June and least in February. Root turnover was greater in summer than in winter, with very fine roots (<0.5 mm) disappearing most rapidly. Trees growing under elevated CO{sub 2} produced more roots in late summer as compared to trees under ambient CO{sub 2}. Roots receiving 0 and 200 kg N/ha survived longer than those receiving 100 kg N/ha. Roots produced under elevated CO{sub 2} live longer than those produced under ambient CO{sub 2}. The occurrence of mycorrhizae and fungal hyphae increased in response to CO{sub 2} treatment but not the nitrogen with the highest levels of occurrence were during the summer.« less
  • A functional understanding of terrestrial ecosystem carbon processes is essential for two reasons. First, carbon flow is a most fundamental aspects of ecosystem function as it mediates most of the energy flow in these systems. Second, carbon flow also mediates the majority of energy flow in the global economy and will do for the foreseeable future. The increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and its inevitable flow through global ecosystems will influence ecosystem processes. There is, of course, great interest in the potential of ecosystems to sequester some of the carbon being loaded into the atmosphere by economic activity.