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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-435-1896, Wilbanks International, Inc. , Hillsboro, Oregon

Abstract

An evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Wilbanks International, Hillsboro, Oregon. Three cases of kidney failure had occurred in male workers after performing similar jobs; each of these workers had been a hydrostatic press operator. Medical evaluations indicated minor renal dysfunction in two of 12 current Wilbanks employees who worked in or near the press area. Medical records, insurance claims and the U.S. End Stage Renal Disease registry were used to identify additional cases of kidney disease at this facility and five other Coors ceramics facilities; there was no excess of renal disease identified at the other facilities. Concern was noted about binder burnoff, which consists of partially combusted byproducts of polyethylene glycol, and which may occasionally vent into the plant from the kilns. Potentially nephrotoxic short chain glycol compounds may exist in these fumes. The authors conclude that a potential hazard may have existed from the recirculation of combustion byproducts from periodic kilns. The authors recommend that medical surveillance be instituted for renal disease in production workers. Engineering controls should be instituted to eliminate exposure to binder burnoff.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6587752
Report Number(s):
PB-89-120653/XAB; HETA-87-435-1896
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BINDERS; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; GLYCOLS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; CERAMICS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; TOXICITY; AIR POLLUTION; ALCOHOLS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 552000 -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Thun, M., McCammon, C., and Wells, V. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-435-1896, Wilbanks International, Inc. , Hillsboro, Oregon. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Thun, M., McCammon, C., & Wells, V. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-435-1896, Wilbanks International, Inc. , Hillsboro, Oregon. United States.
Thun, M., McCammon, C., and Wells, V. 1988. "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-435-1896, Wilbanks International, Inc. , Hillsboro, Oregon". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6587752,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-435-1896, Wilbanks International, Inc. , Hillsboro, Oregon},
author = {Thun, M. and McCammon, C. and Wells, V.},
abstractNote = {An evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Wilbanks International, Hillsboro, Oregon. Three cases of kidney failure had occurred in male workers after performing similar jobs; each of these workers had been a hydrostatic press operator. Medical evaluations indicated minor renal dysfunction in two of 12 current Wilbanks employees who worked in or near the press area. Medical records, insurance claims and the U.S. End Stage Renal Disease registry were used to identify additional cases of kidney disease at this facility and five other Coors ceramics facilities; there was no excess of renal disease identified at the other facilities. Concern was noted about binder burnoff, which consists of partially combusted byproducts of polyethylene glycol, and which may occasionally vent into the plant from the kilns. Potentially nephrotoxic short chain glycol compounds may exist in these fumes. The authors conclude that a potential hazard may have existed from the recirculation of combustion byproducts from periodic kilns. The authors recommend that medical surveillance be instituted for renal disease in production workers. Engineering controls should be instituted to eliminate exposure to binder burnoff.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 5
}

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