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Title: Underwater welding, cutting and inspection

Abstract

Underwater welding, cutting and inspection of offshore, inland waterway and port facilities are becoming a requirement for both military and industrial communities, as maintenance and repair costs continue to escalate, and as many of the facilities are in operation well beyond their intended design life. In nuclear applications, underwater welding, cutting and inspection for repair and modification of irradiated nuclear power plant components are also a requirement. This article summarizes recent developments in this emerging underwater technology.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Ohio Underwater Welding Center)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6580800
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Welding Journal (Miami); (United States); Journal Volume: 74:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; OFFSHORE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; UNDERWATER OPERATIONS; UNDERWATER FACILITIES; CUTTING; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; WELDING; OFFSHORE OPERATIONS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; WELDED JOINTS; FABRICATION; JOINING; JOINTS; MACHINING; MATERIALS TESTING; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; POWER PLANTS; TESTING; THERMAL POWER PLANTS 420500* -- Engineering-- Materials Testing; 423000 -- Engineering-- Marine Engineering-- (1980-); 210000 -- Nuclear Power Plants

Citation Formats

Tsai, C.L. Underwater welding, cutting and inspection. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Tsai, C.L. Underwater welding, cutting and inspection. United States.
Tsai, C.L. 1995. "Underwater welding, cutting and inspection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6580800,
title = {Underwater welding, cutting and inspection},
author = {Tsai, C.L.},
abstractNote = {Underwater welding, cutting and inspection of offshore, inland waterway and port facilities are becoming a requirement for both military and industrial communities, as maintenance and repair costs continue to escalate, and as many of the facilities are in operation well beyond their intended design life. In nuclear applications, underwater welding, cutting and inspection for repair and modification of irradiated nuclear power plant components are also a requirement. This article summarizes recent developments in this emerging underwater technology.},
doi = {},
journal = {Welding Journal (Miami); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 74:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 2
}
  • Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Fivemore » submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given.« less
  • Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.
  • Development of more effective wet welding techniques appears to offer best solution to subsea construction and maintenance.
  • A new underwater cutting technique applying underwater dismantling to commercial atomic reactor vessels has been developed. This technique involves gas cutting the mild steel underwater after removing the stainless steel cladding by arc gouging. The arc gouging is achieved by blowing out metal--which is melted by an arc between a mild steel electrode wire and the stainless steel--by jetting water from a rear water nozzle. The fuel gas employed for preheating for the gas cutting was a mixed gas of propane and 30% methylacetylene. The test piece used was made of 300-mm-thick mild steel with 8-mm-thick stainless steel cladding. Themore » fundamental cutting experiment was carried out successfully under a cutting speed condition of 15 cm/min at a water depth of 20 cm. This apparatus is easy to handle, compact, and cheap.« less