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Title: Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants

Abstract

Seeds of most species of the Umbelliferae (Apiaciae), Araliaceae, and Garryaceae families are characterized by their high content of the unusual C[sub 18] monounsaturated fatty acid petroselinic acid (18:l[Delta][sup 6cis]). Prior to a recent report of this lab, little was known of the biosynthetic origin of the cis[Delta][sup 6] double bond of petroselinic acid. Such knowledge may be of both biochemical and biotechnological significance. Because petroselinic acid is potentially the product of a novel desaturase, information regarding its synthesis may contribute to an understanding of fatty acid desaturation mechanisms in plants. Through chemical cleavage at its double bond, petroselinic acid can be used as a precursor of lauric acid (12:0), a component of detergents and surfactants, and adipic acid (6:0 dicarboxylic), the monomeric component of nylon 6,6. Therefore, the development of an agronomic source of an oil rich in petroselinic acid is of biotechnological interest. As such, studies of petroselinic acid biosynthesis may provide basic information required for any attempt to genetically engineer the production and accumulation of this fatty acid in an existing oilseed.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6573166
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/13729-5
ON: DE93013973
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-87ER13729
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; TRIGLYCERIDES; ANABOLISM; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS; CARROTS; LECITHINS; VEGETABLE OILS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; ESTERS; FOOD; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; LIPIDS; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA; METABOLISM; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; PLANTS; VEGETABLES 550200* -- Biochemistry; 550500 -- Metabolism; 090800 -- Biomass Fuels-- Production-- (1990-); 553000 -- Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Not Available. Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/6573166.
Not Available. Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants. United States. doi:10.2172/6573166.
Not Available. 1993. "Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants". United States. doi:10.2172/6573166. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6573166.
@article{osti_6573166,
title = {Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Seeds of most species of the Umbelliferae (Apiaciae), Araliaceae, and Garryaceae families are characterized by their high content of the unusual C[sub 18] monounsaturated fatty acid petroselinic acid (18:l[Delta][sup 6cis]). Prior to a recent report of this lab, little was known of the biosynthetic origin of the cis[Delta][sup 6] double bond of petroselinic acid. Such knowledge may be of both biochemical and biotechnological significance. Because petroselinic acid is potentially the product of a novel desaturase, information regarding its synthesis may contribute to an understanding of fatty acid desaturation mechanisms in plants. Through chemical cleavage at its double bond, petroselinic acid can be used as a precursor of lauric acid (12:0), a component of detergents and surfactants, and adipic acid (6:0 dicarboxylic), the monomeric component of nylon 6,6. Therefore, the development of an agronomic source of an oil rich in petroselinic acid is of biotechnological interest. As such, studies of petroselinic acid biosynthesis may provide basic information required for any attempt to genetically engineer the production and accumulation of this fatty acid in an existing oilseed.},
doi = {10.2172/6573166},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • Seeds of most species of the Umbelliferae (Apiaciae), Araliaceae, and Garryaceae families are characterized by their high content of the unusual C{sub 18} monounsaturated fatty acid petroselinic acid (18:l{Delta}{sup 6cis}). Prior to a recent report of this lab, little was known of the biosynthetic origin of the cis{Delta}{sup 6} double bond of petroselinic acid. Such knowledge may be of both biochemical and biotechnological significance. Because petroselinic acid is potentially the product of a novel desaturase, information regarding its synthesis may contribute to an understanding of fatty acid desaturation mechanisms in plants. Through chemical cleavage at its double bond, petroselinic acidmore » can be used as a precursor of lauric acid (12:0), a component of detergents and surfactants, and adipic acid (6:0 dicarboxylic), the monomeric component of nylon 6,6. Therefore, the development of an agronomic source of an oil rich in petroselinic acid is of biotechnological interest. As such, studies of petroselinic acid biosynthesis may provide basic information required for any attempt to genetically engineer the production and accumulation of this fatty acid in an existing oilseed.« less
  • Inhibition studies of amino acids in Nicotiana silvestris suspension cells gave clues to the difficulties for obtaining mutants deficient in post prephenate pathway proteins of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis (prephenate aminotransferase, arogenate dehydrogenase and arogenate dehydratase). Such mutants, if successfully obtained, would allow gene-enzyme relationships of aromatic amino acid proteins to be studied. We found that amino acids were inhibitory toward plant cell growth, and thus were unable to rescue analog resistant mutants. Toxicity of all amino acids toward exponentially dividing Nicotiana silvestris suspension cultured cells was monitored by following growth rates. Except for L-glutamine, all 19 protein amino acidsmore » inhibited cell growth. Inhibition of growth progressed to cell deterioration. Electron microscopy showed that amino acids triggered a state of cell shrinkage that eventually degenerated to total cellular disorganization. L-glutamine was not only an effective agent for prevention of amino acid toxicity, but enhanced the final growth yield. L-glutamine also was able to completely reverse inhibition effects in cells that had been in the slowed exponential phase. Two types of inhibition occurred and we have proposed that any amino acid inhibition that can be completely antagonized by L-glutamine be called ''general amino acid inhibition''. ''Specific amino acid inhibition'' resulting from particular pathway imbalances caused by certain exogenous amino acids, can be recognized and studied in the presence of L-glutamine which can abolishes the complication effects of general amino acid inhibition.« less