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Title: Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging

Abstract

To assess the capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate postirradiation changes in the uterus, MR studies of 23 patients who had undergone radiation therapy were retrospectively examined and compared with those of 30 patients who had not undergone radiation therapy. MR findings were correlated with posthysterectomy histologic findings. In premenopausal women, radiation therapy induced (a) a decrease in uterine size demonstrable as early as 3 months after therapy ended; (b) a decrease in signal intensity of the myometrium on T2-predominant MR images, reflecting a significant decrease in T2 relaxation time, demonstrable as early as 1 month after therapy; (c) a decrease in thickness and signal intensity of the endometrium demonstrable on T2-predominant images 6 months after therapy; and (d) loss of uterine zonal anatomy as early as 3 months after therapy. In postmenopausal women, irradiation did not significantly alter the MR imaging appearance of the uterus. These postirradiation MR changes in both the premenopausal and postmenopausal uteri appeared similar to the changes ordinarily seen on MR images of the nonirradiated postmenopausal uterus.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6568802
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiology; (United States); Journal Volume: 170
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; UTERUS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; MENOPAUSE; NMR IMAGING; POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; FEMALE GENITALS; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; 550600* - Medicine; 560151 - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man

Citation Formats

Arrive, L., Chang, Y.C., Hricak, H., Brescia, R.J., Auffermann, W., and Quivey, J.M. Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1148/radiology.170.1.2909120.
Arrive, L., Chang, Y.C., Hricak, H., Brescia, R.J., Auffermann, W., & Quivey, J.M. Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging. United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.170.1.2909120.
Arrive, L., Chang, Y.C., Hricak, H., Brescia, R.J., Auffermann, W., and Quivey, J.M. 1989. "Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging". United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.170.1.2909120.
@article{osti_6568802,
title = {Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging},
author = {Arrive, L. and Chang, Y.C. and Hricak, H. and Brescia, R.J. and Auffermann, W. and Quivey, J.M.},
abstractNote = {To assess the capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate postirradiation changes in the uterus, MR studies of 23 patients who had undergone radiation therapy were retrospectively examined and compared with those of 30 patients who had not undergone radiation therapy. MR findings were correlated with posthysterectomy histologic findings. In premenopausal women, radiation therapy induced (a) a decrease in uterine size demonstrable as early as 3 months after therapy ended; (b) a decrease in signal intensity of the myometrium on T2-predominant MR images, reflecting a significant decrease in T2 relaxation time, demonstrable as early as 1 month after therapy; (c) a decrease in thickness and signal intensity of the endometrium demonstrable on T2-predominant images 6 months after therapy; and (d) loss of uterine zonal anatomy as early as 3 months after therapy. In postmenopausal women, irradiation did not significantly alter the MR imaging appearance of the uterus. These postirradiation MR changes in both the premenopausal and postmenopausal uteri appeared similar to the changes ordinarily seen on MR images of the nonirradiated postmenopausal uterus.},
doi = {10.1148/radiology.170.1.2909120},
journal = {Radiology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 170,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 1
}
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