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Title: The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition

Abstract

The utility of ombrotrophic bogs as archives of atmospheric mercury deposition was assessed with an investigation in Arlberg Bog, Minnesota, US. Since the use of ombrotrophic bogs as archives depends on the immobility of deposited trace metals, the authors examined the postdepositional transport processes revealed by the solid-phase distributions of mercury and ancillary metals in this bog. They modeled metal speciation in bog pore-waters as a function of pe in order to understand metal behavior in ombrotrophic peat. Specifically, they considered the effect of water movement and resultant shifts in redox potential gradients on metal retention. The results indicate that Hg and Pb are immobile in ombrotrophic peat, so their distribution can be used to determine temporal changes in deposition. To substantiate the deposition estimates determined in this study, they emphasized the importance of confirming the validity of the dating scheme, assessing the degree of horizontal homogeneity in the accumulation record, and providing evidence for retention of Hg based on geochemical modeling. As recorded in Arlberg Bog, historic atmospheric Hg deposition increased gradually after the mid-1800s, peaked between 1950 and 1960, and may have declined thereafter. Preindustrial deposition was about 4 {micro}g/m{sup 2} year and recent deposition about 19 {micro}g/m{supmore » 2} year. The results of this study indicate that deposition at Arlberg Bog has been influenced by a regional and/or local-scale source.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Connecticut, Groton, CT (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences
  2. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
655435
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY; AIR POLLUTION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; MINNESOTA; DEPOSITION; MERCURY; PEAT; INTERSTITIAL WATER; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Benoit, J.M., Fitzgerald, W.F., and Damman, A.W.H. The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1006/enrs.1998.3850.
Benoit, J.M., Fitzgerald, W.F., & Damman, A.W.H. The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition. United States. doi:10.1006/enrs.1998.3850.
Benoit, J.M., Fitzgerald, W.F., and Damman, A.W.H. 1998. "The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition". United States. doi:10.1006/enrs.1998.3850.
@article{osti_655435,
title = {The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition},
author = {Benoit, J.M. and Fitzgerald, W.F. and Damman, A.W.H.},
abstractNote = {The utility of ombrotrophic bogs as archives of atmospheric mercury deposition was assessed with an investigation in Arlberg Bog, Minnesota, US. Since the use of ombrotrophic bogs as archives depends on the immobility of deposited trace metals, the authors examined the postdepositional transport processes revealed by the solid-phase distributions of mercury and ancillary metals in this bog. They modeled metal speciation in bog pore-waters as a function of pe in order to understand metal behavior in ombrotrophic peat. Specifically, they considered the effect of water movement and resultant shifts in redox potential gradients on metal retention. The results indicate that Hg and Pb are immobile in ombrotrophic peat, so their distribution can be used to determine temporal changes in deposition. To substantiate the deposition estimates determined in this study, they emphasized the importance of confirming the validity of the dating scheme, assessing the degree of horizontal homogeneity in the accumulation record, and providing evidence for retention of Hg based on geochemical modeling. As recorded in Arlberg Bog, historic atmospheric Hg deposition increased gradually after the mid-1800s, peaked between 1950 and 1960, and may have declined thereafter. Preindustrial deposition was about 4 {micro}g/m{sup 2} year and recent deposition about 19 {micro}g/m{sup 2} year. The results of this study indicate that deposition at Arlberg Bog has been influenced by a regional and/or local-scale source.},
doi = {10.1006/enrs.1998.3850},
journal = {Environmental Research},
number = 2,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month = 8
}
  • The historical mercury accumulation rates (Hg AR) resulting from atmospheric deposition to Xiaoxing'an Mountain were determined via analysis of {sup 210}Pb- and {sup 14}C-dated cores up to 5000 years old. Natural Hg AR background, pre-industrial Hg AR and maximum industrial Hg AR in Northeast China were 2.2 {+-}1.0 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/yr for 5100-4500 BP, 5.7 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/yr and 112.4 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/yr, respectively. We assumed that the increase in Hg deposition in the Xiaoxing'an mountain area during industrial time was mainly attributed to local anthropogenic emissions around this peat bog.
  • Cores collected from ombrotrophic peat bogs in west central, east central, northeast and southwest Scotland were dated (C-14, Pb-210) and analyzed (ICP-OES, ICP-MS) to derive and compare their historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic Pb deposition over the past 2500 years. On the basis of Pb isotopic composition (e. g., Pb-206/Pb-207), clear indications of Pb contamination during the pre-Roman/Roman, post-Roman and medieval periods were attributed to the mining and smelting of Pb ores from Britain and elsewhere in Europe. Between the 17th and early 20th centuries, during the industrial period, the mining and smelting of indigenous Scottish Pb ores were themore » most important sources of anthropogenic Pb deposition at three of the sites. In contrast, at the most southerly site, influences from the use of both British Pb ores and imported Australian Pb ores (in more southern parts of Britain) since the late 19th century were evident. At each of the sites, Australian-Pb-influenced car exhaust emissions (from the 1930s to late 1990s), along with significant contributions from coal combustion (until the late 1960s and onset of the post industrial period), were evident. Atmospheric anthropogenic Pb deposition across Scotland was greatest (similar to 10 to 40 mg m{sup -2} a{sup -1}) between the late 1880s and late 1960s, increasing southward, declining to 0.44 to 5.7 mg m{sup 2} a{sup -1} by the early 2000s.« less
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  • In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran modelsmore » 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.« less
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