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Title: Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis

Abstract

Current standards for detection of myocarditis in a clinical setting rely on endomyocardial biopsy for accurate diagnosis. With this technique a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy show unsuspected myocarditis histologically. Endomyocardial biopsy, despite its specificity, may lack sensitivity due to sampling error if the inflammation is patchy or focal. Therefore, inflammation-sensitive radioisotopic imaging may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of myocarditis. This study was designed to evaluate the applicability of gallium-67 (67Ga) myocardial imaging as an adjunct to endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. Sixty-eight consecutive patients referred for evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy underwent 71 parallel studies with 67Ga imaging and biopsies that served as the basis of comparison for this study. Histologic myocarditis was identified in 8% of biopsy specimens. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters could not be used to predict the presence of myocarditis. Five of six biopsy samples (87%) with myocarditis showed dense 67Ga uptake, whereas only nine of 65 negative biopsy samples (14%) were paired with equivocally positive 67Ga scans. The single patient with myocarditis and no myocardial 67Ga uptake had dense mediastinal lymph node uptake that may have obscured cardiac uptake. The incidence of myocarditis on biopsy with a positive 67Ga scanmore » was 36% (5/14); however, the incidence of myocarditis with a negative 67Ga scan was only 1.8% (1/57). Follow-up scans for three patients showed close correlation of 67Ga uptake with myocarditis on biopsy. In conclusion 67Ga may be a useful screening test for identifying patients with a high yield of myocarditis on biopsy, and serial scans may eliminate the need for frequent biopsies in patients with proven myocarditis.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL
OSTI Identifier:
6541253
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Circulation; (United States); Journal Volume: 70:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; DIAGNOSIS; GALLIUM 67; UPTAKE; HEART; RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING; BIOPSY; INFLAMMATION; MYOCARDIUM; PATIENTS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; GALLIUM ISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPES; MUSCLES; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANS; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; RADIOISOTOPES; SYMPTOMS; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

O'Connell, J.B., Henkin, R.E., Robinson, J.A., Subramanian, R., Scanlon, P.J., and Gunnar, R.M. Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.70.1.58.
O'Connell, J.B., Henkin, R.E., Robinson, J.A., Subramanian, R., Scanlon, P.J., & Gunnar, R.M. Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis. United States. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.70.1.58.
O'Connell, J.B., Henkin, R.E., Robinson, J.A., Subramanian, R., Scanlon, P.J., and Gunnar, R.M. 1984. "Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis". United States. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.70.1.58.
@article{osti_6541253,
title = {Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis},
author = {O'Connell, J.B. and Henkin, R.E. and Robinson, J.A. and Subramanian, R. and Scanlon, P.J. and Gunnar, R.M.},
abstractNote = {Current standards for detection of myocarditis in a clinical setting rely on endomyocardial biopsy for accurate diagnosis. With this technique a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy show unsuspected myocarditis histologically. Endomyocardial biopsy, despite its specificity, may lack sensitivity due to sampling error if the inflammation is patchy or focal. Therefore, inflammation-sensitive radioisotopic imaging may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of myocarditis. This study was designed to evaluate the applicability of gallium-67 (67Ga) myocardial imaging as an adjunct to endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. Sixty-eight consecutive patients referred for evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy underwent 71 parallel studies with 67Ga imaging and biopsies that served as the basis of comparison for this study. Histologic myocarditis was identified in 8% of biopsy specimens. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters could not be used to predict the presence of myocarditis. Five of six biopsy samples (87%) with myocarditis showed dense 67Ga uptake, whereas only nine of 65 negative biopsy samples (14%) were paired with equivocally positive 67Ga scans. The single patient with myocarditis and no myocardial 67Ga uptake had dense mediastinal lymph node uptake that may have obscured cardiac uptake. The incidence of myocarditis on biopsy with a positive 67Ga scan was 36% (5/14); however, the incidence of myocarditis with a negative 67Ga scan was only 1.8% (1/57). Follow-up scans for three patients showed close correlation of 67Ga uptake with myocarditis on biopsy. In conclusion 67Ga may be a useful screening test for identifying patients with a high yield of myocarditis on biopsy, and serial scans may eliminate the need for frequent biopsies in patients with proven myocarditis.},
doi = {10.1161/01.CIR.70.1.58},
journal = {Circulation; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 70:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 7
}
  • Objectives and background: Myocarditis is caused by various agents and autoimmune processes. It is unknown whether viral genome persistence represents inactive remnants of previous infections or whether it is attributed to ongoing adverse processes. The latter also applies to the course of autoimmune myocarditis. One principal candidate for an adverse remodeling is nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF{kappa}B). Methods: A total of 93 patients with suspected myocarditis/cardiomyopathy was examined. Hemodynamics were assessed by echocardiography as well as right and left heart catheterization. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken from the left ventricle. Biopsies were examined by immunohistochemistry and PCR for viral genomes. Selective immunostaining ofmore » activated NF{kappa}B was performed. Results: NF{kappa}B was increased in patients with myocarditis when compared with controls (11.1 {+-} 7.1% vs. 5.0 {+-} 5.3%, P < 0.005) whereas dilated cardiomyopathy showed no significant increase. Patients with myocarditis and preserved left ventricular function exhibited increased activated NF{kappa}B when compared with reduced function (r {sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.001). In parallel, inverse correlation of NF{kappa}B and left ventricular enddiasstolic volume was found (r {sup 2} = 0.43, P < 0.02). Increased activated NF{kappa}B was found in adenovirus persistence when compared with controls (P = 0.001). Only a trend of increased NF{kappa}B activation was seen in cytomegalovirus persistence. Parvovirus B19 persistence did not affect NF{kappa}B activation. Conclusions: Increased activation of NF{kappa}B is related to inflammatory processes in myocarditis. Since activated NF{kappa}B correlates with left ventricular function, it could be assumed that NF{kappa}B activation occurs at early stages of inflammation. Potentially, NF{kappa}B could inhibit loss of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis and protect from cardiac dilation. Since NF{kappa}B is a crucial key transcription factor of inflammation, its prognostic and future therapeutic relevance should be addressed.« less
  • The use of endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scans in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has demonstrated the presence of myocardial inflammation in a subset of patients. A family with DCM was studied with endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scanning; both identified the presence of myocarditis in the proband. Evaluation of histologic sections from deceased family members revealed myocarditis as the principal pathologic finding. This patient identified during life demonstrated a defect in suppressor lymphocytic function and improved with immunosuppressive therapy. A second family with DCM was discovered when postmortem examination of the proband and his father's heart showed myocarditis. A livingmore » sibling was identified with asymptomatic myocardial dysfunction. Longitudinal follow-up of surviving members of both families are in progress. This study indicates that thorough diagnostic evaluation of all patients with familial DCM should be pursued to identify subgroups with potentially treatable inflammation.« less
  • Monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies were undertaken to assess the presence of myocardial uptake in patients with chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Three groups were studied: 17 patients with chronic (greater than 12 months) idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, 12 patients with a large, poorly contracting left ventricle not due to dilated cardiomyopathy (control patients) and 8 normal individuals. The patients in the cardiomyopathy and control groups showed a similar degree of clinical and functional impairment. Imaging was undertaken 48 h after antimyosin injection. The heart/lung ratio of antimyosin uptake was used to assess the results. The mean ratio in the cardiomyopathy group wasmore » 1.83 +/- 0.36 (range 1.40 to 2.80), a value significantly higher than that obtained in the control patients without cardiomyopathy (mean 1.46 +/- 0.04, range 1.38 to 1.50) or normal subjects (mean 1.46 +/- 0.13, range 1.31 to 1.6) (p less than 0.01). No difference in the ratio was noted between the normal subjects and control patients. Abnormal antimyosin uptake was seen in 12 (70%) of the 17 patients with cardiomyopathy and in only 1 (8%) of the 12 control patients. Positive monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies are highly prevalent in chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.« less
  • Iodine-123 (I-123) meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was performed in 31 patients. Three patients were without cardiac disease and 28 had idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy with various degrees of left ventricular dysfunction. The qualitatively assessed myocardial I-123 MIBG scintigrams and the myocardial versus mediastinal I-123 MIBG uptake ratio were related to I-123 MIBG activity and norepinephrine concentration determined from endomyocardial biopsy samples taken from the right side of the interventricular septum. Scintigrams and the MIBG uptake ratio were also related to plasma catecholamine concentrations, left ventricular ejection fraction and New York Heart Association functional class. Patients with distinct myocardial I-123 MIBG uptake (scoremore » 1) had a normal ejection fraction (58 +/- 16%). Patients with diffusely reduced uptake or scintigraphic defects (score 2) had a significantly lower ejection fraction (38 +/- 9%, p less than 0.05), whereas patients with shadowy or no visible myocardial uptake (score 3) had the lowest ejection fraction (23 +/- 6%, p less than 0.002 versus patients with score 2). The scintigraphically determined I-123 MIBG activity in the septal region correlated significantly with I-123 MIBG activity from the endomyocardial biopsy samples (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001, n = 9). The myocardial versus mediastinal I-123 MIBG activity ratio was significantly related to myocardial norepinephrine concentration (r = 0.63, n = 28) and to left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.74, n = 31). These data suggest that myocardial I-123 MIBG scintigraphy is a useful noninvasive method for the assessment of myocardial adrenergic nervous system disintegrity in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.« less
  • The radioidinated synthetic fatty acid iodine-123 phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) has proven useful in the identification of regional abnormalities of cardiac metabolism in patients with myocardial ischemia. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that the myocardial distribution and turnover of fatty acids, assessed noninvasively with IPPA, are altered in patients with cardiomyopathy. Nine normal volunteers and 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy of various etiologies underwent cardiac imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of IPPA. Apical short-axis and basal short-axis sections were reconstructed and quantitatively analyzed for relative IPPA activity distribution and washout. Patients withmore » congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrated significantly greater heterogeneity of IPPA uptake than normal subjects (maximal percent variation of activity 27 +/- 11 vs 18 +/- 4, p less than 0.01). They also demonstrated a more rapid percent washout rate than control subjects (24 +/- 8 vs 17 +/- 6 for the apical short-axis section, p less than 0.05; 26 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 5 for the basal short-axis section, p less than 0.01). These abnormalities of fatty acid distribution and turnover were independent of the etiology of the cardiomyopathy. The degree of heterogeneity of IPPA uptake was significantly related to the patients' New York Heart Association functional class (r = 0.64, p less than 0.01). Thus, compared with normal myocardium, the myocardium of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrates a more heterogeneous distribution of fatty acid uptake, which parallels the clinical severity of the disease. Furthermore, patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrate a more rapid myocardial clearance of the labeled fatty acid, as assessed with SPECT imaging.« less