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Title: Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies

Abstract

Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN
OSTI Identifier:
6539155
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: South. Med. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 73:7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSTIC USES; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PEDIATRICS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; XEROGRAPHY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; PATIENTS; MEDICINE; RADIOLOGY; TOMOGRAPHY; USES; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Heller, R.M., Coulam, C.M., Allen, J.H., Fleischer, A., Lee, G.S., Kirchner, S.G., and James A.E. Jr.. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1097/00007611-198007000-00006.
Heller, R.M., Coulam, C.M., Allen, J.H., Fleischer, A., Lee, G.S., Kirchner, S.G., & James A.E. Jr.. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies. United States. doi:10.1097/00007611-198007000-00006.
Heller, R.M., Coulam, C.M., Allen, J.H., Fleischer, A., Lee, G.S., Kirchner, S.G., and James A.E. Jr.. 1980. "Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies". United States. doi:10.1097/00007611-198007000-00006.
@article{osti_6539155,
title = {Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies},
author = {Heller, R.M. and Coulam, C.M. and Allen, J.H. and Fleischer, A. and Lee, G.S. and Kirchner, S.G. and James A.E. Jr.},
abstractNote = {Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.},
doi = {10.1097/00007611-198007000-00006},
journal = {South. Med. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 73:7,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 7
}
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