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Title: Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

Abstract

Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yamagata Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)
OSTI Identifier:
6538155
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Forensic Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 33:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; TEETH; ELECTRON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; CALCIUM; COLOR; DENTIN; DENTISTRY; DOGS; IRON; PHOSPHORUS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; ANIMALS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ELEMENTS; MAMMALS; MEDICINE; METALS; MICROANALYSIS; MICROSCOPY; NONMETALS; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; ORAL CAVITY; ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VERTEBRATES; 550801* - Morphology- Tracer Techniques; 550600 - Medicine

Citation Formats

Ikeda, N., Watanabe, G., Harada, A., and Suzuki, T.. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1520/JFS12576J.
Ikeda, N., Watanabe, G., Harada, A., & Suzuki, T.. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth. United States. doi:10.1520/JFS12576J.
Ikeda, N., Watanabe, G., Harada, A., and Suzuki, T.. 1988. "Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth". United States. doi:10.1520/JFS12576J.
@article{osti_6538155,
title = {Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth},
author = {Ikeda, N. and Watanabe, G. and Harada, A. and Suzuki, T.},
abstractNote = {Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.},
doi = {10.1520/JFS12576J},
journal = {J. Forensic Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 33:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month =
}
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